Learning Stories [58] are documents that are used by caregivers and educators in childcare settings. They use a storytelling format instead of a traditional ‘observation’ report to document the different ways that young children learn, and capture the moment in greater detail and provide parents with a greater insight into the events that occur in their child’s time in childcare.
Many types of childcare discuss the different ways in which children are cared for by adults or older children. One additional type of child care involves children caring for adults. Children as caretakers are most often seen in developing countries with restricted or hard-to-access medical assistance. Child caretakers are common in families where the parents are affected by HIV/AIDS and other mental illnesses that might limit their parental functioning.[22]
The fact that women are more likely to take time out of the workforce to provide unpaid care for their children is part of the reason why there is a persistent gender wage gap in this country—10.5 percent of the differences in men’s and women’s earnings can be attributed to labor-force experience. When women work less, they pay less into Social Security over a shorter period of time, which is one of the reasons why retired women are more likely to live in poverty than retired men.
Pre-school is often the term used to refer to child care centers that care primarily for 3 and 4-year old children. Preschool can be based in a center, family child care home or a public school. Older children, in their turn, in most countries are cared in an educational setting, usually a primary school environment. The children are supervised by a teacher all day long, who is responsible for their physical, intellectual, emotional and social development. In this regard, most western countries have compulsory education during which the great majority of children are at school starting from five or six years of age. The school will act in loco parentis meaning "in lieu of parent supervision." In many locales, government is responsible for monitoring the quality of care.

Do you want your child to have fun, engaging opportunities that support continued learning and personal growth outside of school? Seattle Parks and Recreation, in partnership with Associated Recreation Council offers programs that provide children with opportunities to develop socially, emotionally, and physically. We work in partnership with local schools to make sure your child's educational experience is constantly being enriched. Our trained staff works daily to offer activities in areas such as: arts and culture, environmental stewardship, health and fitness, academic support, and more.


The Child Care Resource Network works in cooperation with Early Learning Indiana and their Indiana Business Partnership Project to develop child care resource and referral programs for employers who recognize the relationship between quality child care arrangements and increased productivity, reduced turnover, reduced tardiness and absenteeism, raised morale and an enhanced corporate image.


In order to best protect confidential and other important data, the ODJFS website will no longer support several outdated web browsers. Effective December 5, Internet Explorer 6 or older, Opera 4 or older and Netscape Navigator will no longer work on ODJFS sites that are https-enabled. Individuals can download the most recent version of Internet Explorer here and the most recent version of Opera here.

×