Some jurisdictions require licensing or certification. Parents may also turn to independent rating services, or rely on recommendations and referrals. Some places develop voluntary quality networks, for example in Australia most childcare services are part of a national Quality Assurance system. Some places require caregivers to take classes in pediatric CPR and first aid. Most countries have laws relating to childcare, which seek to keep children safe and prevent and punish child abuse. Such laws may add cost and complexity to childcare provision and may provide tools to help ensure quality childcare.
Brandywine is a year-round school open for ages 1-12. We build strong relationships with our parents, so they feel confident in the quality education their children receive – at realistic prices. Parents know we care for each family that puts their child’s education into our trust every day. Our daily goal is to create a safe and secure environment where children have the best opportunity to learn.

Pre-school is often the term used to refer to child care centers that care primarily for 3 and 4-year old children. Preschool can be based in a center, family child care home or a public school. Older children, in their turn, in most countries are cared in an educational setting, usually a primary school environment. The children are supervised by a teacher all day long, who is responsible for their physical, intellectual, emotional and social development. In this regard, most western countries have compulsory education during which the great majority of children are at school starting from five or six years of age. The school will act in loco parentis meaning "in lieu of parent supervision." In many locales, government is responsible for monitoring the quality of care.
" We just wanted to reach out and tell you how impressed we were with Treasures during our visit on February 19. We opened the door to this warm, calm, inviting facility and immediately felt any apprehensions about leaving "our baby" melt away. The entry area was roomy, organized, and clean (so nice when we had all our bulky ski gear on), the sign in process was efficient, and most importantly, the lovely caregivers were calm, confident, warm, and reassuring. Back near the child care rooms, our 3 year old, transitioned from us to a care giver and headed into the room without any crying or struggle. This was a pleasant surprise (ok, a shock!) to us, given we had never been to Treasures, and since the last time we had recently taken her to a babysitting facility at a NH ski resort, she came unraveled- in a big way!! We really attribute this smooth drop off to your staff and the general calm, welcoming feel of the facility. We loved the window area we could view her from, and we left quickly for the slopes, feeling she was in great hands and was lucky to be at such a wonderful place for the day. It was a delight as we would ski down the mountain, passing Treasures, knowing she was in there, being well taken care of. Thank you for giving us that peace of mind."
Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) provides low-income, working families with access to affordable, quality child care that allows them to continue working and contributes to the healthy, emotional and social development of the child. CCAP can help families pay for care in center-based or home settings. Families are required to cost-share on a sliding scale based on family size and income.
The Child Care Resource Network works in cooperation with Early Learning Indiana and their Indiana Business Partnership Project to develop child care resource and referral programs for employers who recognize the relationship between quality child care arrangements and increased productivity, reduced turnover, reduced tardiness and absenteeism, raised morale and an enhanced corporate image.
In general, the geographic limitations and the diversity in type of daycare providers make child daycare a highly fragmented industry. The largest providers own only a very small share of the market. This leads to frustration for parents who are attempting to find quality child daycare, with 87% of them describing the traditional search for child daycare as "difficult and frustrating".[citation needed]
According to Chris Knight, the first humans were few; then the population "exploded .... Population expansion on such a scale is inconsistent with female tolerance of infanticide, harassment, or the heavy costs to mothers of male philandering and double standards. If unusually large numbers of unusually large-brained offspring were being successfully raised to maturity, the quality of childcare must have been exceptional. We know what the optimal solution would have been. There can be no doubt that mothers would have done best by ... taking advantage of every available childcare resource."[45]
Legislation may mandate staffing ratios (for example, 6 weeks to 12 months, 1:4; 12 months to 18 months, 1:5; 18 months to 24 months, 1:9; etc.). The caregiver-to-child ratio is one factor indicative of quality of care. Ratios vary greatly by location and by daycare center. Potential consequences of a caregiver:child ratio which is too high could be very serious[citation needed]. However, many states allow a higher numbers of toddlers to caregivers and some centers do not comply consistently. For example, within the US: Pennsylvania, ages 1–3, 1 teacher to 5 children;[69] Missouri: age 2, 1 teacher to 8 children;[70] North Carolina: 1 teacher to 10 children.[68]
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recognizes the important role high quality, affordable and accessible child care plays in the lives of NIH employees.  Each of the NIH sponsored child care centers are separate private businesses, operated by parent boards.  Each center provides a unique learning experience and is held to the highest standards of quality.  The NIH Child Care Program has set up a system to ensure the centers consistently provide care which follows Maryland Child Care Licensing Standards, as well as maintaining accreditation through the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). 
Hi, my name is Tyla and I have been providing child care services to families for over 10 years and am currently looking for a full-time position with an awesome family! *I have over 2000 hours in early classroom + many ECE completed courses as well as many years experience as a nanny/house manager (overnights included) *CPR/First Aid, Medicine Administration, Universal Precautions Cert. *Bachelor's of Science in Psychology *Currently working on Masters (Mental Health Counseling) *I have amazing references! *During my time with kiddos, I incorporate many activities, including outside play time, arts and crafts, reading, pretend play, music and dancing, and other creative play. I also love the outdoors and bringing children on walks, going to the park and playing sports. Also, I do have two kiddos of my own and tend to either work 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. while they are at school or in camp, or I arrange to have them with me when that works for everyone. I have amazing references for this!
Whether they're just crawling or ready to run, jump and climb, kids ages 6 weeks to 5 years will have an adventure packed day through hands-on learning and outdoor adventure. Centrally located in the Clocktower Building in the Main Base Area, Mount Snow Child Care is a welcoming, state-licensed facility that provides individual classrooms full of enriching age appropriate activities.

Important Note: Due to Seattle Public Schools bell time changes, Seattle Parks and Recreation has changed their School Age Care operating hours to meet the needs of most families. With programs running longer and the City of Seattle's minimum wage increase we've had to increase our prices moving forward. Our rates are still competitive with other before and after school programs. Please contact your local Community Center for more information about prices and hours of operation changes. 
Parents spend a significant amount of time raising their children. These parents nurture and develop their children into being functional members of society. This hard work is not motivated by monetary gain. For centuries it has been assumed that women will stay home and take care of the children while their husbands go out and work. In most cases, the husbands get all the credit for providing for the family. However, the wife who is the homemaker, deserves just as much credit for her care work. Caregivers do not receive monetary compensation and they must pay a ‘care-penalty.[41]
Children that receive informal care do not receive the same educational and preparatory regimens as those in a center- or home-based center often do. Instead, learning occurs informally as a direct result of the caretaker and charge's interactions. Learning and development occur differently for every individual. Different periods of a child's growth are known to affect the care taking styles associated with them, from the care of an infant to that of an older adolescent. Other influences on care taking include the expectations of the three parties involved- the parents, caretakers, and children.[2]
Parents spend a significant amount of time raising their children. These parents nurture and develop their children into being functional members of society. This hard work is not motivated by monetary gain. For centuries it has been assumed that women will stay home and take care of the children while their husbands go out and work. In most cases, the husbands get all the credit for providing for the family. However, the wife who is the homemaker, deserves just as much credit for her care work. Caregivers do not receive monetary compensation and they must pay a ‘care-penalty.[41]
Using part of a family’s total income is a second but equally problematic option for securing child care. In recent years the costs of care have skyrocketed, placing a disproportionate burden on families’ budgets. The fact is, for millions of families across the United States, paying for high-quality private child care is an economic impossibility.
More contemporary proposals for government advancement of day care in the United States have experienced a checkered path, for example, in 1971, the Comprehensive Child Development Act was passed by Congress, but was vetoed by Richard Nixon. It "would have created nationally funded child care centers providing early childhood services and after-school care, as well as nutrition, counseling, and even medical and dental care. The centers would charge parents on a sliding scale."[63] Various proposals have been considered, but to date, none leading to legislation that would establish a national policy supporting day care in the United States.
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