Learning Stories [58] are documents that are used by caregivers and educators in childcare settings. They use a storytelling format instead of a traditional ‘observation’ report to document the different ways that young children learn, and capture the moment in greater detail and provide parents with a greater insight into the events that occur in their child’s time in childcare.


The quality of the center based child care can be very influential on the child and on their overall development. Recent study showed that children in low end classrooms saw the activities as forced while the children in high end classrooms had more memorable experiences.[12] Even though this being the case between high and low end classrooms, other aspects such as the child's background and living situation can play an important role in their development.[13] Active children may thrive in the educational activities provided by a quality commercial care center, but according to the National Center for Early Development and Learning, children from low quality centers may be significantly less advanced in terms of vocabulary and reading skills.[14] Classes are usually largest in this type of care, ratios of children to adult caregivers will vary according to state licensing requirements. Some positive aspects of commercial care are that children may gain a sense of independence, academic achievement, and socialization.[15] Not only is this age crucial for the improvement of their social skills, but also it begins the stages of understanding a classroom setting. Childcare is seen as a reasonable option because it is different than parenting, since it can be seen as more of a routine for the child.[11] This in turn will only have a negative impact on the child if the parent is not their for the emotional needs of the child.[11] Children are placed into centers of socialization and learn many similarities and differences from one another from a very young age.[11] Children are also placed into settings to develop their linguistics and cognitive abilities, which can be measured through observations.[16] Not only is this age crucial for the improvement of their social skills, but also it begins the stages of understanding a classroom setting. These early ages of the child's life are crucial or it would otherwise have a negative impact on their future paths.[12]
The staff of this state-licensed facility are specialists in non-recurring child care, and with kindness and patience help children successfully transition in unfamiliar surroundings. Your infants and toddlers are in good hands with our caring counselors. TREASURES staff are trained in first aid, CPR, child development and behavior management. Our staff participate in on-going and relevant early childhood training. And, our child-to-caregiver ratio assures full attention and the best possible care. Entertaining your kids will be no challenge at all! For the peace of mind and comfort of visiting families, TREASURES strives for consistent caregiver scheduling during a child's stay in the center.
The Child Care Resource Network works in cooperation with Early Learning Indiana and their Indiana Business Partnership Project to develop child care resource and referral programs for employers who recognize the relationship between quality child care arrangements and increased productivity, reduced turnover, reduced tardiness and absenteeism, raised morale and an enhanced corporate image.
More contemporary proposals for government advancement of day care in the United States have experienced a checkered path, for example, in 1971, the Comprehensive Child Development Act was passed by Congress, but was vetoed by Richard Nixon. It "would have created nationally funded child care centers providing early childhood services and after-school care, as well as nutrition, counseling, and even medical and dental care. The centers would charge parents on a sliding scale."[63] Various proposals have been considered, but to date, none leading to legislation that would establish a national policy supporting day care in the United States.
Preschool education (Frühpädagogik) is increasingly seen as an integral part of education as a whole; several states such as Bavaria have released detailed educational plans for daycare carriers who claim state subsidies. "Early pedagogics" has increasingly moved into the academic domain, with an increasing number of staff being trained at universities of applied science (Fachhochschulen) and regular universities. Non-academic personnel in daycare facilities have usually attended specialized schools for several years. In the state of Bavaria for example, daycare assistants (Kinderpfleger) will have attended school for two years, daycare teachers (Erzieher) for three years with an additional two-year internship.
In the United States, childcare in regulated commercial or family childcare home setting is administered or led by teachers who may have a Child Development Associate or higher credentials. These higher credentials include Associate, Bachelor, and even master's degrees in the field of Early Childhood Education (ECE). Although childcare professionals may obtain a degree, many states require that they attend workshops yearly to upgrade their knowledge and skill levels. Many day cares require a teacher to obtain a certain amount of training. For example, Texas requires a minimum of 25 hours a year, and the first year as a teacher, you are required to have 50 hours.
We are a childcare and preschool provider who is committed to being the top of the class for you and your children’s care and early educational experiences. Our focus is to provide an encouraging educational experience, which promotes all areas of development to assist children in becoming lifelong scholars. We strive to give parents complete peace of mind, while being seen as an exemplar of what a quality childcare and preschool center should be.

My work has changed. I am not doing nanny work per se anymore, but more like therapeutic respite care. The childcare I currently do is in service to coaching the family. I am there for parents who are looking for more understanding of their children's behavior and more peace with their role as a parent. I am there for children who are not comfortable with the life around them, who resist transitions, who challenge boundaries. It is my aim to be a translator for one to the other. I obtained my Master's Degree from Bank St. College in Early Childhood Development. I am a certified "Beyond Consequences " Parent Coach, and for many years trained in Pre/Perinatal Psychology. I have 25 years experience working hands-on with children in a wide variety of ages and settings. I am available in 3-hour slots to work with children. Parent coaching is additional and required.


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