We are proud to say that Brandywine Child Care and Preschool has over 10 years of serving the Delaware communities of Wilmington and Claymont. With more than three decades of knowledge, our administration and teachers are well versed in early childhood education. All students benefit from our comprehensive program that includes aspects of learning to develop cognitive and exploration skills among others.
In his 2013 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama made a historic pledge to provide universal, high-quality pre-K education to our nation’s children. He chose to make this one of his administration’s priorities with good reason: Early childhood education has myriad benefits, including better, more equitable long-term outcomes for children of divergent economic backgrounds. Moreover, investments in these programs help cultivate a future workforce, secure long-term economic competitiveness, and develop our nation’s future leaders. Universal high-quality pre-K and child care would also throw a much-needed raft to families across America that are struggling to stay afloat while footing costly child care bills, missing work to provide care, or sending their children—our nation’s future innovators and workforce—to low-quality care centers.
If you would like to start your search on your own, the Child Care Facility Search page will bring you to a search window that will allow you to search the entire database of regulated child care providers in New York State (with the exception of day care centers in New York City). This search engine will allow you to look up a specific provider by name, or all the providers in a particular county or even zip code. It also lets you search by different types of care, such as family day care or day care centers. You will see information on the program including contact information, address, capacity, when it first opened and the current status of its license or registration.

The creation of childcare programs in Mexico is quite different from others because it focuses on the “defeminization of labor and the defamilization of care.”[86] Female participation is a goal that the government has so it set in place many policies and modes to achieve this.[86] The creation of a successful program of child care has been sought out and many different aspects have been changed over the years but it can be seen that there is an increase in early childhood education and care services (ECEC).[86] ECEC services can be broken down into three different time periods and models which were implemented. The first would be in the 1970s when the Institute for Social Security focuses on covering children for mothers who were covered by Social Security services.[86] This caused a huge gap in the children that could be covered due to the fairly large amount of women working in the informal sector and being denied these services. The second stage would be in the early 200s when the Ministry of Public education made preschool mandatory for all children from ages 3 to 5.[86] This was useful in theory because all of the children in this age range would be cared for, but in reality caused a strain in the amount of time that the parents had to go and work or dedicate their time elsewhere. The last stage would be in 2007 when the Ministry of Social Development created a childcare program in which was focuses on helping out children and mothers who were not covered by the social security services.[86] This was successful since it targeted low income families specifically. For families to be eligible for this service the mothers had to be working or searching for a job, the income was taken into consideration in comparison to that of minimum wage, and that they did not have any other access to services.[88] Women's participation in the workforce and be directly tied to the availability of childcare services and how it would affect their household.[84]
Childcare varies dramatically across cultures. These discrepancies are attributed to the homestead and household environments. That is, the type of work performed by adult caretakers in a given community strongly influence the type of childcare used. In agricultural/ horticultural societies where work is done to provide sustenance for the community, siblings and similar-aged children are responsible for younger children.[2] While many global communities prefer children aged 7–10 for designated caregiving responsibilities, children no younger than 12 are preferred in the Western world where paid childcare is common.[23]
×