Important Note: Due to Seattle Public Schools bell time changes, Seattle Parks and Recreation has changed their School Age Care operating hours to meet the needs of most families. With programs running longer and the City of Seattle's minimum wage increase we've had to increase our prices moving forward. Our rates are still competitive with other before and after school programs. Please contact your local Community Center for more information about prices and hours of operation changes. 
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Important Note: Due to Seattle Public Schools bell time changes, Seattle Parks and Recreation has changed their School Age Care operating hours to meet the needs of most families. With programs running longer and the City of Seattle's minimum wage increase we've had to increase our prices moving forward. Our rates are still competitive with other before and after school programs. Please contact your local Community Center for more information about prices and hours of operation changes. 
NORTH ADAMS, MA (June 8, 2017) – Anne Nemetz-Carlson, President/CEO, announced that the MA Department of Early Education and Care (EEC) and Children’s Investment Fund has awarded to Child Care of the Berkshires a new grant of $1,000,000 to make improvements to the Haskins facility which houses the Monument Square Early Childhood Center and a variety of family support programs, including the Family Center, the Healthy Families Program, and the Parent Child Home Early Literacy Program.
The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in its programs on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability or political beliefs. Persons with disability who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact the USDA"s TARGET Center at (202)720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination, write the USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (202)720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity employer.
The creation of childcare programs in Mexico is quite different from others because it focuses on the “defeminization of labor and the defamilization of care.”[86] Female participation is a goal that the government has so it set in place many policies and modes to achieve this.[86] The creation of a successful program of child care has been sought out and many different aspects have been changed over the years but it can be seen that there is an increase in early childhood education and care services (ECEC).[86] ECEC services can be broken down into three different time periods and models which were implemented. The first would be in the 1970s when the Institute for Social Security focuses on covering children for mothers who were covered by Social Security services.[86] This caused a huge gap in the children that could be covered due to the fairly large amount of women working in the informal sector and being denied these services. The second stage would be in the early 200s when the Ministry of Public education made preschool mandatory for all children from ages 3 to 5.[86] This was useful in theory because all of the children in this age range would be cared for, but in reality caused a strain in the amount of time that the parents had to go and work or dedicate their time elsewhere. The last stage would be in 2007 when the Ministry of Social Development created a childcare program in which was focuses on helping out children and mothers who were not covered by the social security services.[86] This was successful since it targeted low income families specifically. For families to be eligible for this service the mothers had to be working or searching for a job, the income was taken into consideration in comparison to that of minimum wage, and that they did not have any other access to services.[88] Women's participation in the workforce and be directly tied to the availability of childcare services and how it would affect their household.[84]
Remember, though, whether you get a list from our web site or from the CCRR, this list is just a starting point - you will need to contact the provider to see if they have space for your child and you will want to visit the child care provider to make sure for yourself that this is the right match for you. The Office of Children and Family Services has a helpful brochure, As you think about child care... / Cuando piense en los servicios de cuidado infantil..., which you can view from this web site or have mailed to you by your CCRR or Regional Office of the Division of Child Care Services.
Evidence from other countries shows that child care subsidies increase women’s labor force participation, help them obtain more stable jobs, and increase their income. While interventions in the United States have been much more modest by international standards, there is ample evidence showing that child care assistance helps working moms. Families who receive child care support are more likely to be employed and have longer employment spells that families who do not receive support. The effects are particularly strong for single mothers, who are nearly 40 percent more likely to maintain employment over two years than those who do not have help paying for child care.
Learning Stories [58] are documents that are used by caregivers and educators in childcare settings. They use a storytelling format instead of a traditional ‘observation’ report to document the different ways that young children learn, and capture the moment in greater detail and provide parents with a greater insight into the events that occur in their child’s time in childcare.
In addition to the positive long-term impacts that high-quality preschool and child care have on children and the economy, these programs provide important benefits to working parents, especially working mothers. The prohibitively high costs of private child care and the dearth of quality, accessible public providers means that parents are often left to choose between the lesser of two evils: low-quality care or forgoing needed pay to stay at home and care for a child themselves.
Before you start your licensed child care. preschool and schoolage only search, we encourage you to use the information in the booklet from Child Care Aware®, Is This The Right Place For My Child? It provides information on what to look for when searching for child care, preschool and schoolage only programs to support your child's growth and development. You will also find a helpful checklist that can be taken with you when visiting programs and providers.
Childcare is primarily funded by parents, however the Single Funding Formula (pre-school funding) can be used at some day nurseries, playgroups and schools for a maximum of 5 sessions per week, after a child reaches 3 years. The government introduced a childcare allowance (vouchers) by which employers could make payments for childcare, prior to tax, on employees' wages.

More specifically, further research indicates that children being cared for by siblings or similarly-aged children (a trend more commonly seen in agriculturally-based cultural communities) have certain psychological and developmental effects on those being cared for. These effects include but are not limited to: mother-child attachment, emergence of childhood developmental stages, formation of playgroups, development of social responsibility, sex differences, personality differences, cognition, and motivation and performance in the classroom.[2]
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