Hi, my name is Tyla and I have been providing child care services to families for over 10 years and am currently looking for a full-time position with an awesome family! *I have over 2000 hours in early classroom + many ECE completed courses as well as many years experience as a nanny/house manager (overnights included) *CPR/First Aid, Medicine Administration, Universal Precautions Cert. *Bachelor's of Science in Psychology *Currently working on Masters (Mental Health Counseling) *I have amazing references! *During my time with kiddos, I incorporate many activities, including outside play time, arts and crafts, reading, pretend play, music and dancing, and other creative play. I also love the outdoors and bringing children on walks, going to the park and playing sports. Also, I do have two kiddos of my own and tend to either work 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. while they are at school or in camp, or I arrange to have them with me when that works for everyone. I have amazing references for this!
Studies have been done to get an annual salary estimate for a female caregiver. One survey suggested that the value of a mother's work, if she were paid the average wage for each task she performs in running the household and caring for her children, is $117,867 per year.[42] The reason for the high salary is because mothers typically perform about 10 different job functions throughout the week. Some of these job functions are poorly paid, including cleaning, driving, caring for children, and washing laundry, but others, especially financial and managerial tasks that the survey equated with being the Chief Executive Officer of a company, are highly paid. Neither a nanny nor a housekeeper makes nearly as much money, and almost all of these tasks except direct child care also have to be done by non-parents. The value of unpaid childcare is also an important figure in various legal entities. Expert witnesses (most often economists) are occasionally brought into court cases to give estimates on the value of unpaid labor. By giving estimation, the plaintiff or defendant can be fairly compensated for their labor.
According to the 1995 U.S. Census Bureau Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP), over thirty-six percent of families of preschoolers with working mothers primarily relied on childcare in the home of a relative, family daycare provider or other non-relative. Almost twenty-six percent of families used organized childcare facilities as their primary arrangement.[90]
More contemporary proposals for government advancement of day care in the United States have experienced a checkered path, for example, in 1971, the Comprehensive Child Development Act was passed by Congress, but was vetoed by Richard Nixon. It "would have created nationally funded child care centers providing early childhood services and after-school care, as well as nutrition, counseling, and even medical and dental care. The centers would charge parents on a sliding scale."[63] Various proposals have been considered, but to date, none leading to legislation that would establish a national policy supporting day care in the United States.
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