Intraday Data provided by SIX Financial Information and subject to terms of use. Historical and current end-of-day data provided by SIX Financial Information. All quotes are in local exchange time. Real-time last sale data for U.S. stock quotes reflect trades reported through Nasdaq only. Intraday data delayed at least 15 minutes or per exchange requirements.
Licensing Staff inspect centers twice a year. Health and fire officials visit once a year. The center director is required to be educated or experienced in early care and education. All caregivers who work 500 hours or more a year are required to attend 16 hours of annual training. Center directors are required to attend 16 hours of annual training. Directors and caregivers are also required to have certification in Adult, Child and Infant CPR and First Aid.
Note: Some programs offering child day care obtain a general business license to operate from the county within which they do business; however, that license is not the same as a child day care license obtained from the Virginia Department of Social Services (VDSS), which holds the child day care provider accountable to the health and safety standards set forth by the Commonwealth of Virginia.
The costs of child care are even more extreme for younger mothers. The average age when mother’s first give birth in the United States is 25.7 years, meaning that half of new mothers are under the age of 26 when they have their first child. Not surprisingly, younger mothers tend to have lower incomes: By virtue of their age, they have less job tenure and are more likely than older mothers to still be completing their education. But this means that mothers under age 25 with a young child who are paying for child care end up spending a staggering one-third—33 percent—of their income on care because they typically earn less. (see Table 1) It is critical that these women have the opportunity to finish their education and gain job experience, but child care expenses can make that a daunting prospect.
Unless otherwise noted on an individual document, CCL grants permission to copy and distribute documents and information for non-commercial use, provided they are copied and distributed without alteration. This site contains web addresses and links to other sites; however, CCL is not responsible for the privacy practices or the content of these web sites. Please review DFPS/CCL Privacy Policy for further details.
In Denmark day-cares accept children ranging from 6 months old to 3 years old. 91.2% of 1-2 year old children are enrolled in different types of day-care institutions. Most of these are managed by a municipality and mostly government funded. The different types of institutions ranges from separate day-care institutions (Vuggestue), kindergartens with a day-care department (Integrerede institutioner) and in-home day-care (Dagpleje).[82]
Unless otherwise noted on an individual document, CCL grants permission to copy and distribute documents and information for non-commercial use, provided they are copied and distributed without alteration. This site contains web addresses and links to other sites; however, CCL is not responsible for the privacy practices or the content of these web sites. Please review DFPS/CCL Privacy Policy for further details.
More contemporary proposals for government advancement of day care in the United States have experienced a checkered path, for example, in 1971, the Comprehensive Child Development Act was passed by Congress, but was vetoed by Richard Nixon. It "would have created nationally funded child care centers providing early childhood services and after-school care, as well as nutrition, counseling, and even medical and dental care. The centers would charge parents on a sliding scale."[63] Various proposals have been considered, but to date, none leading to legislation that would establish a national policy supporting day care in the United States.
×