You don't always get what you pay for, and in this instance, it's a good thing. Quality programs can be very affordable, so I wouldn't brush off a program based solely on price. There are even free programs available which offer children amazing opportunities and resources. You don't have to break the bank to find a great program, so definitely do your homework.
Most families currently have three options for securing child care. First, parents can stay at home and care for their children themselves. But this is increasingly difficult, as most families now rely on two breadwinners to stay above water. Moreover, mothers are more likely than fathers to take time away from paid work to care for a child, which can exacerbate mothers’ lifetime earnings gap. Second, parents can pay for child care out of pocket. But this approach is very costly for families, eating up 35.9 percent of a low-income family’s monthly budget. The third option for families is to use federal- or state-funded child care, but access to any publicly funded program, let alone a high-quality program, is very limited. Nationwide, nearly three in four children are not enrolled in a federal or state-funded pre-K program.
Our tuition based preschool programs use the Connect 4 Learning curriculum with an emphasis on S.T.E.A.M. (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math) to promote innovative thinking in our young learners. We offer a literacy rich program which includes oral language development, rhyme, writing, and phonemic awareness. We believe children learn through play and hands-on experiences. We place an enormous value on the role of the environment as a motivating force for creative learning. Each preschool classroom environment is equipped with these interest areas: dramatic play, blocks, art, sand/water sensory table, math manipulatives/puzzles and games, music and movement, science and STEAM stations. Outdoor play time, library, technology and cooking activities are included in our daily schedules. We recognize class size is another crucial factor in educating young children. Our preschool class sizes will not exceed 16 children in a classroom. Smaller class sizes mean we are able to provide more individualized instruction to our preschoolers during our small group times and throughout our preschool day.
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recognizes the important role high quality, affordable and accessible child care plays in the lives of NIH employees.  Each of the NIH sponsored child care centers are separate private businesses, operated by parent boards.  Each center provides a unique learning experience and is held to the highest standards of quality.  The NIH Child Care Program has set up a system to ensure the centers consistently provide care which follows Maryland Child Care Licensing Standards, as well as maintaining accreditation through the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). 

Spain provides paid maternity leave of 16 weeks with 30-50% of mothers returning to work (most full-time) after this[citation needed], thus babies 4 months of age tend to be placed in daycare centers. Adult-infant ratios are about 1:7-8 first year and 1:16-18 second year.[citation needed] Public preschool education is provided for most children aged 3–5 years in "Infantil" schools which also provide primary school education.[citation needed]
×