Parents spend a significant amount of time raising their children. These parents nurture and develop their children into being functional members of society. This hard work is not motivated by monetary gain. For centuries it has been assumed that women will stay home and take care of the children while their husbands go out and work. In most cases, the husbands get all the credit for providing for the family. However, the wife who is the homemaker, deserves just as much credit for her care work. Caregivers do not receive monetary compensation and they must pay a ‘care-penalty.[41]
Child Care Connections is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that serves as the only child care resource and referral agency in Gallatin, Park, Meagher, Broadwater, Jefferson, and Lewis and Clark Counties. Research demonstrates that consistent nurturing child care, with good parenting, helps children develop to their full potential. Child Care Connections supports families and the local economy by encouraging quality child care and safety.
Parents are typically the legal owners of the non-profit day care and will routinely provide consulting services in areas in which they are professionally qualified (for example accounting, legal advice, or human resources) for free. (There are some non-profits not operated by parents, but by a board of directors made up of community representatives who want what is good for the children.)
Since 1986, the Child Care Connection has been committed to a range of programs and services that meet the needs of today's families. The agency, based in Trenton, New Jersey, has a dedicated staff of more than 30 professionals with extensive experience in the fields of education, early care, and health and behavioral sciences. In addition, we work with a pool of highly qualified consultants with expertise in human resources, organizational development, and gerontology.
Child Care Licensing (CCL) via Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) maintains this web site as a public service. All information provided is believed to be accurate and reliable; however, CCL via DFPS assumes no responsibility for the use of the information provided. Since inaccuracies may occur, these pages do not replace official sources. If you find some questionable information, please e-mail [email protected]

Mt. Zion's programs are built around the needs of each child. Teacher to child ratios are low to provide for individual attention. Children daily experience planned activities and open-ended experiences for individual growth and development. Children explore their world through music, large motor play, sensory exploration, language, and small group events.
How Do We Secure Information Transmissions? When you send confidential personal information to us on our website, a secure server software which we have licensed encrypts all information you input before it is sent to us. The information is scrambled en route and decoded once it reaches our website. Other email that you may send to us may not be secure unless we advise you that security measures will be in place prior to your transmitting the information. For that reason, we ask that you do not send confidential information such as Social Security, credit card, or account numbers to us through an unsecured email.
Brandywine is a year-round school open for ages 1-12. We build strong relationships with our parents, so they feel confident in the quality education their children receive – at realistic prices. Parents know we care for each family that puts their child’s education into our trust every day. Our daily goal is to create a safe and secure environment where children have the best opportunity to learn.
You’ve found the most comprehensive collection of information about childcare centers in the U.S, with 122,016 licensed childcare centers and 121,278 home daycare providers. Selecting a childcare center for our children is one of the most important decisions we make as parents. It’s important to choose a preschool or home daycare to which children love to go and where safety is of the utmost concern. Please use the Quick Search box on this page to find the perfect child care solution for your family!
How Do We Use Information Collected From Cookies? We use website browser software tools such as cookies and web server logs to gather information about our website users' browsing activities, in order to constantly improve our website and better serve our users. This information assists us to design and arrange our web pages in the most user-friendly manner and to continually improve our website to better meet the needs of our users and prospective users. Cookies help us collect important business and technical statistics. The information in the cookies lets us trace the paths followed by users to our website as they move from one page to another. Web server logs allow us to count how many people visit our website and evaluate our website's visitor capacity. We do not use these technologies to capture your individual email address or any personally identifying information about you.
All childcare workers must have, or be undertaking, the minimum "Certificate III in Children's Services" in order to work in a centre (Recognition of Prior Learning is available to help qualify staff with many years experience, but no qualifications). (Common more advanced qualifications are "Diploma of Children's Services" and an Early Childhood Education degree).
Be sure that the preschool or child care program you are looking into is operating according to the minimum requirements set by your local government. Some programs require licensing, while others may not. I know of a few amazing programs across the U.S. that are not licensed, but are still legal and would be wonderful options for families. It's important that parents do research, get referrals, look up ratings (if available), and truly find out what goes on inside of any program they have decided upon.
Child Care Licensing (CCL) via Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) maintains this web site as a public service. All information provided is believed to be accurate and reliable; however, CCL via DFPS assumes no responsibility for the use of the information provided. Since inaccuracies may occur, these pages do not replace official sources. If you find some questionable information, please e-mail [email protected]
The Department of Children and Families, Office of Child Care Regulation, has issued an Emergency Order to assist providers in reopening and relocating after Hurricane Michael. The Emergency Order allows the Department to waive certain child care standards. At a minimum all child care providers must have power and water to operate. The Emergency Order is limited to the following counties: Bay, Calhoun, Gadsden, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Jefferson, Liberty, Wakulla, Walton, and Washington. If you are a child care provider in an affected county, please contact your local licensing office to start the process of becoming operational.
The first crèche was opened by Firmin Marbeau on 14 November 1844 in Paris,[62] The Société des Crèches was recognized by the French government in 1869. Originating in Europe in the late 18th and early 19th century, day cares were established in the United States by private charities in the 1850s, such as the Charity Organization Society founded by Ansley Wilcox. The Fitch Creche in Buffalo, New York was known as the first day center for working mothers in the United States. Another at that time was the New York Day Nursery in 1854.
Parents are typically the legal owners of the non-profit day care and will routinely provide consulting services in areas in which they are professionally qualified (for example accounting, legal advice, or human resources) for free. (There are some non-profits not operated by parents, but by a board of directors made up of community representatives who want what is good for the children.)

The National Institute of Health released a study in March, 2007 after following a group of children through early childhood to the 6th grade.[91] The study found that the children who received a higher quality of childcare scored higher on 5th grade vocabulary tests than the children who had attended childcare of a lower quality. The study also reported that teachers found children from childcare to be "disobedient", fight more frequently, and more argumentative. The study reported the increases in both aggression and vocabulary were small. "The researchers emphasized that the children’s behavior was within the normal range and were not considered clinically disordered."
Pre-school is often the term used to refer to child care centers that care primarily for 3 and 4-year old children. Preschool can be based in a center, family child care home or a public school. Older children, in their turn, in most countries are cared in an educational setting, usually a primary school environment. The children are supervised by a teacher all day long, who is responsible for their physical, intellectual, emotional and social development. In this regard, most western countries have compulsory education during which the great majority of children are at school starting from five or six years of age. The school will act in loco parentis meaning "in lieu of parent supervision." In many locales, government is responsible for monitoring the quality of care.
In general, the geographic limitations and the diversity in type of daycare providers make child daycare a highly fragmented industry. The largest providers own only a very small share of the market. This leads to frustration for parents who are attempting to find quality child daycare, with 87% of them describing the traditional search for child daycare as "difficult and frustrating".[citation needed]

In Germany, preschool education is the domain of the Kindertagesstätte (literally "children's day site", often shortened to Kita or KITA), which is usually divided into the Kinderkrippe (crèche) for toddlers (age up to 3 years), and the Kindergarten for children who are older than three years and before school. Children in their last Kindergarten year may be grouped into a Vorschule ("preschool") and given special pedagogic attention; special preschool institutions comparable to the US-American kindergarten are the exception.
Access to child care is essential to a woman’s ability to participate in the workforce, and a lack of access to child care affects the work-family balance of both women and men. Women need to have the ability to make the choices that are best for them and their families in both the short and long term, and greater national investments in child care and preschool programs could help remove some of the constraints that may push mothers toward decisions that have negative economic consequences for them and their families down the road. It would make quality care more affordable for American families and support mothers’ employment.
The program that was created in 2007 became known as the Federal Daycare Programme for Working Mothers.[86] This program allowed for subsidized home and community based childcare. The one running the care centers would only have to have a training component, which consisted of a psychological test and training courses to understand the principles of childcare, before being able to open their business in which they would be given money to furnish the facility as necessary for a safe caring center to be created.[86] Another way this program was set into place was by subsidizing the care of non-profits, private for profits, or religious institutions who were based in the area of need.[86]
×