In this more informal type of care, a parent or legal guardian selects an individual- often a family member, friend, or neighbor to care for all the children in one family or up to 2 unrelated children. Legally Certified Providers must pass Montana and FBI criminal background checks and Child Protective Services background checks but are not otherwise regulated or monitored by the State of Montana.
Parent-Child Home Program celebrated 14 families graduating from their 2-year program on May 25, at The Green, 85 Main St., North Adams.  Families enjoyed pizza and cupcakes, a short circle time, and parachute play with their home visitors, as they said good-bye.  The Parent-Child Home Program is a brain building program for 18 month old – 2 1/2 year old children and their caregivers.  Families receive fun books, toys, and lots of ideas to help their children get ready to succeed in school.  For more information call the coordinator, Karen Rowe, 663-6593 x. 27.

Annually, the Child Care Connection delivers over 1,000 training hours to parents, caregivers, and child care professionals. In 1995 the Early Childhood Institute for Professional Development was formed to offer a state-of-the-art educational program to individuals in the field. In the workplace, we deliver lunch-time seminars to help employees address work and family-related issues.
Child care, or otherwise known as daycare, is the care and supervision of a child or multiple children at a time, whose age ranges from six weeks to thirteen years. Child care is the action or skill of looking after children by a day-care center, nannies, babysitter, teachers or other providers. Child care is a broad topic that covers a wide spectrum of professionals, institutions, contexts, activities, social and cultural conventions. Early child care is an equally important and often overlooked component of child development. Child care providers can be children's first teachers, and therefore play an integral role in systems of early childhood education. Quality care from a young age can have a substantial impact on the future successes of children. The main focus of childcare is on the development of the child, whether that be mental, social, or psychological.[1]
Hi, my name is Tyla and I have been providing child care services to families for over 10 years and am currently looking for a full-time position with an awesome family! *I have over 2000 hours in early classroom + many ECE completed courses as well as many years experience as a nanny/house manager (overnights included) *CPR/First Aid, Medicine Administration, Universal Precautions Cert. *Bachelor's of Science in Psychology *Currently working on Masters (Mental Health Counseling) *I have amazing references! *During my time with kiddos, I incorporate many activities, including outside play time, arts and crafts, reading, pretend play, music and dancing, and other creative play. I also love the outdoors and bringing children on walks, going to the park and playing sports. Also, I do have two kiddos of my own and tend to either work 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. while they are at school or in camp, or I arrange to have them with me when that works for everyone. I have amazing references for this!

Care.com does not employ any care provider or care seeker nor is it responsible for the conduct of any care provider or care seeker. Care.com provides information and tools to help care seekers and care providers connect and make informed decisions. However, each individual is solely responsible for selecting an appropriate care provider or care seeker for themselves or their families and for complying with all applicable laws in connection with any employment relationship they establish. The information contained in member profiles, job posts and applications are supplied by care providers and care seekers themselves and is not information generated or verified by Care.com. Care.com does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment or engage in any conduct that requires a professional license.


Family child care providers care for children in the provider's own home. The children could be in a mixed age group with a low adult to child ratio. Care can also potentially be personalized and individual. The hours may be more flexible and the provider may offer evening and weekend care for parents who work shifts. The cost in a family child care could be significantly lower on average than that of a center.

Learning Stories [58] are documents that are used by caregivers and educators in childcare settings. They use a storytelling format instead of a traditional ‘observation’ report to document the different ways that young children learn, and capture the moment in greater detail and provide parents with a greater insight into the events that occur in their child’s time in childcare.
Family ski site www.familyskitrips.com: "Smugglers' Notch, the leader of the pack when it comes to accommodating parents, offers daycare for babies as early as six-weeks-old. Everything about "Treasures" daycare is prime for powder-craving parents: the slopeside setting, the custom designed age-appropriate rooms, and the staff of some of the best trained caregivers in the ski biz."

Only about 22 percent of children in low-income families currently receive federally subsidized child care, and while preschool enrollment has increased nationwide in recent years, the lowest-income children are the least likely to participate in preschool programs. Twenty-eight percent of 4-year-olds were enrolled in state-funded pre-K programs, and only 4 percent of 3-year-olds were similarly enrolled. Forty percent are not enrolled in any pre-K program at all. Clearly, the publicly funded services that are available are lacking, insufficient, or both.
The vast majority of childcare is still performed by the parents, in-house nanny or through informal arrangements with relatives, neighbors or friends. For example, in Canada, among two parent families with at least one working parent, 62% of parents handle the childcare themselves, 32% have other in-home care (nannies, relatives, neighbours or friends) and only 6.5% use a formal day care center.[64]
The service is known as day care[50][51] or childcare[52][53][54] in the United Kingdom, North America, and Australia and as crèche in Ireland and New Zealand. According to Oxford Living Dictionaries, child care in two words can in addition have the broader meaning of the care of a child by anyone, including the parents,[55] but US dictionaries do not record that spelling or meaning.[53][56][54] In English-speaking and other conservative countries, the vast majority of childcare is still performed by the parents, in-house nannies or through informal arrangements with relatives, neighbors or friends, but most children are in daycare centers for most of the day in Nordic Countries, for example. Child care in the child's own home is traditionally provided by a nanny or au pair, or by extended family members including grandparents, aunts and uncles. Child care is provided in nurseries or crèches or by a nanny or family child care provider caring for children in their own homes. It can also take on a more formal structure, with education, child development, discipline and even preschool education falling into the fold of services.
Some jurisdictions require licensing or certification. Parents may also turn to independent rating services, or rely on recommendations and referrals. Some places develop voluntary quality networks, for example in Australia most childcare services are part of a national Quality Assurance system. Some places require caregivers to take classes in pediatric CPR and first aid. Most countries have laws relating to childcare, which seek to keep children safe and prevent and punish child abuse. Such laws may add cost and complexity to childcare provision and may provide tools to help ensure quality childcare.
Licensing Staff inspect centers twice a year. Health and fire officials visit once a year. The center director is required to be educated or experienced in early care and education. All caregivers who work 500 hours or more a year are required to attend 16 hours of annual training. Center directors are required to attend 16 hours of annual training. Directors and caregivers are also required to have certification in Adult, Child and Infant CPR and First Aid.

Access to child care is essential to a woman’s ability to participate in the workforce, and a lack of access to child care affects the work-family balance of both women and men. Women need to have the ability to make the choices that are best for them and their families in both the short and long term, and greater national investments in child care and preschool programs could help remove some of the constraints that may push mothers toward decisions that have negative economic consequences for them and their families down the road. It would make quality care more affordable for American families and support mothers’ employment.
I'm the youngest of my family of four, though my extended family is very, very large. I've not only taken care of many of cousin's children, but I was a care taker for three years as my full time job. I watched over my older sister's business partner's two girls from senior year in high school to the beginning of my junior year in college. I would have continued with such work, yet my boss had recently quit her job and did not need my services for some time. Thus, I had to move on. I have since looked after her children when she needs, and as stated before, many of my cousins have had children and contact me for taking care of them. I really like working with kids, I learn so much for myself and I always come back with wonderful stories to share. I have also been accepted into a program to school children in foreign countries in the far future and it is something I'm greatly looking forward to.
Childcare varies dramatically across cultures. These discrepancies are attributed to the homestead and household environments. That is, the type of work performed by adult caretakers in a given community strongly influence the type of childcare used. In agricultural/ horticultural societies where work is done to provide sustenance for the community, siblings and similar-aged children are responsible for younger children.[2] While many global communities prefer children aged 7–10 for designated caregiving responsibilities, children no younger than 12 are preferred in the Western world where paid childcare is common.[23]
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