The Child and Family Programs Team functions as the liaison between the child care providers, families receiving care, and NIH.  The Team monitors and ensures compliance of NIH Use Agreements and quality assurance within each NIH sponsored child care center and facility.  If you have additional questions or need more information, please call the NIH Child and Family Programs team at:  301-827-3250.

Learning Stories [58] are documents that are used by caregivers and educators in childcare settings. They use a storytelling format instead of a traditional ‘observation’ report to document the different ways that young children learn, and capture the moment in greater detail and provide parents with a greater insight into the events that occur in their child’s time in childcare.


Since 1986, the Child Care Connection has been committed to a range of programs and services that meet the needs of today's families. The agency, based in Trenton, New Jersey, has a dedicated staff of more than 30 professionals with extensive experience in the fields of education, early care, and health and behavioral sciences. In addition, we work with a pool of highly qualified consultants with expertise in human resources, organizational development, and gerontology.
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recognizes the important role high quality, affordable and accessible child care plays in the lives of NIH employees.  Each of the NIH sponsored child care centers are separate private businesses, operated by parent boards.  Each center provides a unique learning experience and is held to the highest standards of quality.  The NIH Child Care Program has set up a system to ensure the centers consistently provide care which follows Maryland Child Care Licensing Standards, as well as maintaining accreditation through the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). 

Parents are typically the legal owners of the non-profit day care and will routinely provide consulting services in areas in which they are professionally qualified (for example accounting, legal advice, or human resources) for free. (There are some non-profits not operated by parents, but by a board of directors made up of community representatives who want what is good for the children.)
Independent studies suggest that good daycare for non-infants is not harmful.[57] In some cases, good daycare can provide different experiences than parental care does, especially when children reach two and are ready to interact with other children. Bad daycare puts the child at physical, emotional and attachment risk. Higher quality care was associated with better outcomes. Children in higher quality childcare had somewhat better language and cognitive development during the first 4½ years of life than those in lower quality care. They were also somewhat more cooperative than those who experienced lower quality care during the first 3 years of life.
Developmental benefits are also seen for older siblings or relatives tasked to care for younger children. For example, children with siblings are more likely to prohibit prosocial behaviors (such as the ability to take another's perspective or sharing with others) than children without siblings.[44] Additionally, sibling caretakers have to opportunity to develop deeper communication skills as they teach younger siblings to participate in everyday tasks.[44]
In Scotland Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education is responsible for improving care and education for children from birth to age eighteen. This is implemented by inspections carried out by HMIE itself or by other members of inspection and review teams. Inspection reports include feedback from staff and parents as well as the inspectors, aiming to provide parents and carers information to help them decide whether a particular child care setting is providing good quality child care and meeting government standards.[26]
Australia has a large child care industry,[73] however in many locations (especially in inner-city suburbs of large cities and in rural areas) the availability is limited and the waiting periods can be up to several years.[74] The Australian government's Child Care Subsidy[75] scheme provides generous assistance with child care costs, but this still leaves many families with a large out of pocket expense. The median weekly cost of centre-based long day care in 2013 was approximately A$364[76] which puts it out of the reach of lower income earners.[77]

Independent studies suggest that good daycare is not harmful.[57] In some cases, good daycare can provide different experiences than parental care does, especially when children reach two and are ready to interact with other children. Children in higher quality childcare had somewhat better language and cognitive development during the first 4½ years of life than those in lower quality care.

There are many things to consider when parents enroll a child into a care center or other form of paid childcare, and there is much controversy surrounding the potential benefits and harm caused by this type of care. The parental decisions of leaving a child with someone and who that someone will be are two of the most difficult decisions in the lives of most parents.[30] A parent must consider the safety and security of their children when making this decision. The development of a child has many factors, but it is most directly influenced by the type and quality of care that is most regularly provided to the child.


Our volunteers and community partners play a key role in our Head Start and Early Head start programs. While 80% of the program is funded through federal dollars, CCA works with community partners to meet the remaining 20% of funds, volunteer service hours, and in-kind donations needed to operate Head Start and Early Head Start. As we work to expand research and policy to advance early childhood development, we wish to thank those who give their resources to make this possible.

NORTH ADAMS, MA (June 8, 2017) – Anne Nemetz-Carlson, President/CEO, announced that the MA Department of Early Education and Care (EEC) and Children’s Investment Fund has awarded to Child Care of the Berkshires a new grant of $1,000,000 to make improvements to the Haskins facility which houses the Monument Square Early Childhood Center and a variety of family support programs, including the Family Center, the Healthy Families Program, and the Parent Child Home Early Literacy Program.
It is important to assess the value of caregivers because they are what truly make society function,[43] and often their work is under-appreciated. They prepare the next generation for school, work, and decision-making. The way in which a child is nurtured at a young age and through adolescence has both psychological and developmental effects that effect their future. Not only does the child depend on caregiving, but schools and employers depend on the childcare. The government also benefits because these children turn into productive members of society. Eventually, they will be the ones running the country.
The costs of child care are even more extreme for younger mothers. The average age when mother’s first give birth in the United States is 25.7 years, meaning that half of new mothers are under the age of 26 when they have their first child. Not surprisingly, younger mothers tend to have lower incomes: By virtue of their age, they have less job tenure and are more likely than older mothers to still be completing their education. But this means that mothers under age 25 with a young child who are paying for child care end up spending a staggering one-third—33 percent—of their income on care because they typically earn less. (see Table 1) It is critical that these women have the opportunity to finish their education and gain job experience, but child care expenses can make that a daunting prospect.
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