The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recognizes the important role high quality, affordable and accessible child care plays in the lives of NIH employees.  Each of the NIH sponsored child care centers are separate private businesses, operated by parent boards.  Each center provides a unique learning experience and is held to the highest standards of quality.  The NIH Child Care Program has set up a system to ensure the centers consistently provide care which follows Maryland Child Care Licensing Standards, as well as maintaining accreditation through the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). 

More contemporary proposals for government advancement of day care in the United States have experienced a checkered path, for example, in 1971, the Comprehensive Child Development Act was passed by Congress, but was vetoed by Richard Nixon. It "would have created nationally funded child care centers providing early childhood services and after-school care, as well as nutrition, counseling, and even medical and dental care. The centers would charge parents on a sliding scale."[63] Various proposals have been considered, but to date, none leading to legislation that would establish a national policy supporting day care in the United States. 

Annually, the Child Care Connection delivers over 1,000 training hours to parents, caregivers, and child care professionals. In 1995 the Early Childhood Institute for Professional Development was formed to offer a state-of-the-art educational program to individuals in the field. In the workplace, we deliver lunch-time seminars to help employees address work and family-related issues.


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Child care, or otherwise known as daycare, is the care and supervision of a child or multiple children at a time, whose age ranges from six weeks to thirteen years. Child care is the action or skill of looking after children by a day-care center, nannies, babysitter, teachers or other providers. Child care is a broad topic that covers a wide spectrum of professionals, institutions, contexts, activities, social and cultural conventions. Early child care is an equally important and often overlooked component of child development. Child care providers can be children's first teachers, and therefore play an integral role in systems of early childhood education. Quality care from a young age can have a substantial impact on the future successes of children. The main focus of childcare is on the development of the child, whether that be mental, social, or psychological.[1]
Licensing Staff inspect centers twice a year. Health and fire officials visit once a year. The center director is required to be educated or experienced in early care and education. All caregivers who work 500 hours or more a year are required to attend 16 hours of annual training. Center directors are required to attend 16 hours of annual training. Directors and caregivers are also required to have certification in Adult, Child and Infant CPR and First Aid.
Looking for child care? Parents can receive free referrals and information about child care programs from their local Child Care Resource and Referral (CCR&R) agency or online at www.excelerateillinois.com. Referrals to all types of child care providers - licensed centers, family child care homes, and group child care homes as well as license exempt centers and homes are available. Information on quality of care, State licensing and the Illinois ExceleRate system are also available.
In this more informal type of care, a parent or legal guardian selects an individual- often a family member, friend, or neighbor to care for all the children in one family or up to 2 unrelated children. Legally Certified Providers must pass Montana and FBI criminal background checks and Child Protective Services background checks but are not otherwise regulated or monitored by the State of Montana.
Since 1986, the Child Care Connection has been committed to a range of programs and services that meet the needs of today's families. The agency, based in Trenton, New Jersey, has a dedicated staff of more than 30 professionals with extensive experience in the fields of education, early care, and health and behavioral sciences. In addition, we work with a pool of highly qualified consultants with expertise in human resources, organizational development, and gerontology.

FamiliesFind information on:Finding Child CareAffording Child CareQuality Child CareTypes of Child CareBOLD Beginning!More...ProvidersFind information on:Upcoming Policy ChangesRules and FormsIncident/Injury Electronic SubmissionTrainingNew Staff Orientation CurriculumLicensing ComplianceHealth and SafetyDay CampsMore...ResourcesFind information on:Ohio Child Care Advisory CouncilPartnershipsState and Federal ReportsResearchMarket RateContact UsMore...Recent NewsSUTQ Payment Estimator ToolTAP - Time, Attendance and PaymentHelp DeskCCIDS Child Care Information Data SystemInterested in Child Care Updates?Sign up for the child care RSS feed.Interested in opening a child care program?
Child Care Licensing (CCL) via Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) maintains this web site as a public service. All information provided is believed to be accurate and reliable; however, CCL via DFPS assumes no responsibility for the use of the information provided. Since inaccuracies may occur, these pages do not replace official sources. If you find some questionable information, please e-mail [email protected]
In his 2013 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama made a historic pledge to provide universal, high-quality pre-K education to our nation’s children. He chose to make this one of his administration’s priorities with good reason: Early childhood education has myriad benefits, including better, more equitable long-term outcomes for children of divergent economic backgrounds. Moreover, investments in these programs help cultivate a future workforce, secure long-term economic competitiveness, and develop our nation’s future leaders. Universal high-quality pre-K and child care would also throw a much-needed raft to families across America that are struggling to stay afloat while footing costly child care bills, missing work to provide care, or sending their children—our nation’s future innovators and workforce—to low-quality care centers.
The quality of the center based child care can be very influential on the child and on their overall development. Recent study showed that children in low end classrooms saw the activities as forced while the children in high end classrooms had more memorable experiences.[12] Even though this being the case between high and low end classrooms, other aspects such as the child's background and living situation can play an important role in their development.[13] Active children may thrive in the educational activities provided by a quality commercial care center, but according to the National Center for Early Development and Learning, children from low quality centers may be significantly less advanced in terms of vocabulary and reading skills.[14] Classes are usually largest in this type of care, ratios of children to adult caregivers will vary according to state licensing requirements. Some positive aspects of commercial care are that children may gain a sense of independence, academic achievement, and socialization.[15] Not only is this age crucial for the improvement of their social skills, but also it begins the stages of understanding a classroom setting. Childcare is seen as a reasonable option because it is different than parenting, since it can be seen as more of a routine for the child.[11] This in turn will only have a negative impact on the child if the parent is not their for the emotional needs of the child.[11] Children are placed into centers of socialization and learn many similarities and differences from one another from a very young age.[11] Children are also placed into settings to develop their linguistics and cognitive abilities, which can be measured through observations.[16] Not only is this age crucial for the improvement of their social skills, but also it begins the stages of understanding a classroom setting. These early ages of the child's life are crucial or it would otherwise have a negative impact on their future paths.[12]

A similar study in New York City found that more than a third of families on the child care assistance waitlist either lost jobs or were unable to work, and one in five had either missed or been late for work because of their child care problems. Perhaps even more alarmingly, a quarter of families on a child care waitlist in Minnesota had to rely on public assistance in order to make ends meet while waiting to access child care subsidies.
Disclaimer: We at ChildcareCenter strive daily to keep our listings accurate and up-to-date, and to provide top-level, practical information that you can use and trust. However, ChildcareCenter.us does not endorse or recommend any of the childcare providers listed on its site, cannot be held responsible or liable in any way for your dealings with them, and does not guarantee the accuracy of listings on its site. We provide this site as a directory to assist you in locating childcare providers in your area. We do not own or operate any child care facility, and make no representation of any of the listings contained within ChildcareCenter.us.
^ Jump up to: a b Rooshenas, L; Wood, F; Brookes-Howell, L; Evans, MR; Butler, CC (May 2014). "The influence of children's day care on antibiotic seeking: a mixed methods study". The British journal of general practice : the journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners. 64 (622): e302–12. doi:10.3399/bjgp14x679741. PMC 4001146. PMID 24771845.
"Nearly every Saturday of the 2013 and 2014 ski season, our son went to Treasures. He was so excited about it each week! We loved the attentive care, open and clean space and the healthy food. They let him nap when he needed to and there was always a number of activities for him to choose from. He even got to try out skis on a few occasions. We're sad that he won't be there this season, since he'll ... be over 3. We highly recommend Treasures to everyone and it's the main reason that we chose Smuggs."
Child Care Licensing (CCL) via Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) maintains this web site as a public service. All information provided is believed to be accurate and reliable; however, CCL via DFPS assumes no responsibility for the use of the information provided. Since inaccuracies may occur, these pages do not replace official sources. If you find some questionable information, please e-mail [email protected]
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The fact that women are more likely to take time out of the workforce to provide unpaid care for their children is part of the reason why there is a persistent gender wage gap in this country—10.5 percent of the differences in men’s and women’s earnings can be attributed to labor-force experience. When women work less, they pay less into Social Security over a shorter period of time, which is one of the reasons why retired women are more likely to live in poverty than retired men.
Developmental benefits are also seen for older siblings or relatives tasked to care for younger children. For example, children with siblings are more likely to prohibit prosocial behaviors (such as the ability to take another's perspective or sharing with others) than children without siblings.[44] Additionally, sibling caretakers have to opportunity to develop deeper communication skills as they teach younger siblings to participate in everyday tasks.[44]
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More contemporary proposals for government advancement of day care in the United States have experienced a checkered path, for example, in 1971, the Comprehensive Child Development Act was passed by Congress, but was vetoed by Richard Nixon. It "would have created nationally funded child care centers providing early childhood services and after-school care, as well as nutrition, counseling, and even medical and dental care. The centers would charge parents on a sliding scale."[63] Various proposals have been considered, but to date, none leading to legislation that would establish a national policy supporting day care in the United States.
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