Little Rascals on Snow is an add-on feature to our full day program at TREASURES. These tykes enjoy circle time, singing and stories, arts and crafts, imaginative play, snow play in the enclosed playground and more. This group can additionally enjoy a first introduction to skiing or snowboarding with our Little Rascals on Snow program, which gets them comfortable with equipment, sliding and balancing techniques. The Little Rascals enjoy riding up our dedicated conveyor lift located within TREASURES fenced playground area!
We are excited to be a part of the proven success of early care and education programs. Through research, services and advocacy, Child Care Services Association realizes improvements to the child care system throughout North Carolina and across the country. As a national nonprofit agency and United Way member, we are proud to be a leader and innovator in strengthening the early care and education system.
In his 2013 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama made a historic pledge to provide universal, high-quality pre-K education to our nation’s children. He chose to make this one of his administration’s priorities with good reason: Early childhood education has myriad benefits, including better, more equitable long-term outcomes for children of divergent economic backgrounds. Moreover, investments in these programs help cultivate a future workforce, secure long-term economic competitiveness, and develop our nation’s future leaders. Universal high-quality pre-K and child care would also throw a much-needed raft to families across America that are struggling to stay afloat while footing costly child care bills, missing work to provide care, or sending their children—our nation’s future innovators and workforce—to low-quality care centers.
Many agricultural communities highly value sibling- and peer- caretaking. Accounts from the Idakho tribe in Kenya portray infants being left to the care and guidance of other relatively young children in the community with adults and other tribe members merely within shouting distance should a problem arise. The same pattern of caregiving is seen in the Kikuyu people in Kenya, where mothers in the horticultural society are often away working, which relies on siblings, cousins, and neighbors to care for children as young as 4 months old.[2]
In general, the geographic limitations and the diversity in type of daycare providers make child daycare a highly fragmented industry. The largest providers own only a very small share of the market. This leads to frustration for parents who are attempting to find quality child daycare, with 87% of them describing the traditional search for child daycare as "difficult and frustrating".[citation needed]
Fifty years ago suggesting that one parent stay at home and forgo paid employment to provide child care would have made plenty of sense both culturally and economically. This was largely because families could live comfortably on one breadwinner’s income and also because women had traditionally been relegated to the domestic sphere. But in the past 40 years, due to both social advances and economic changes, American families have undergone a dramatic change. Leaving the workforce to provide care today, even temporarily, carries real risks.

This age group spends time together in the open space playroom, listening to music, singing, and dancing. They will have the opportunity to explore painting, enjoy squishing play dough, chase bubbles, jump and romp in the ball pit, move along to circle games, and stomp through the snow in the enclosed playground. There is a 4:1 child to caregiver ration for this group.

Parents are typically the legal owners of the non-profit day care and will routinely provide consulting services in areas in which they are professionally qualified (for example accounting, legal advice, or human resources) for free. (There are some non-profits not operated by parents, but by a board of directors made up of community representatives who want what is good for the children.)


Brandywine is a year-round school open for ages 1-12. We build strong relationships with our parents, so they feel confident in the quality education their children receive – at realistic prices. Parents know we care for each family that puts their child’s education into our trust every day. Our daily goal is to create a safe and secure environment where children have the best opportunity to learn.
A similar study in New York City found that more than a third of families on the child care assistance waitlist either lost jobs or were unable to work, and one in five had either missed or been late for work because of their child care problems. Perhaps even more alarmingly, a quarter of families on a child care waitlist in Minnesota had to rely on public assistance in order to make ends meet while waiting to access child care subsidies.
My child was seriously injured here due to neglect. My children hated every single time they had to... attend, complaining of being ignored and much worse. The staff FALSIFY documents and have no understanding of supervision or ratios. Anyone considering this center I advise to do your research first; ask around and check out licensing reports! See More
Spain provides paid maternity leave of 16 weeks with 30-50% of mothers returning to work (most full-time) after this[citation needed], thus babies 4 months of age tend to be placed in daycare centers. Adult-infant ratios are about 1:7-8 first year and 1:16-18 second year.[citation needed] Public preschool education is provided for most children aged 3–5 years in "Infantil" schools which also provide primary school education.[citation needed]
Childcare varies dramatically across cultures. These discrepancies are attributed to the homestead and household environments. That is, the type of work performed by adult caretakers in a given community strongly influence the type of childcare used. In agricultural/ horticultural societies where work is done to provide sustenance for the community, siblings and similar-aged children are responsible for younger children.[2] While many global communities prefer children aged 7–10 for designated caregiving responsibilities, children no younger than 12 are preferred in the Western world where paid childcare is common.[23]
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