The National Institute of Health released a study in March, 2007 after following a group of children through early childhood to the 6th grade.[91] The study found that the children who received a higher quality of childcare scored higher on 5th grade vocabulary tests than the children who had attended childcare of a lower quality. The study also reported that teachers found children from childcare to be "disobedient", fight more frequently, and more argumentative. The study reported the increases in both aggression and vocabulary were small. "The researchers emphasized that the children’s behavior was within the normal range and were not considered clinically disordered."
Learning Stories [58] are documents that are used by caregivers and educators in childcare settings. They use a storytelling format instead of a traditional ‘observation’ report to document the different ways that young children learn, and capture the moment in greater detail and provide parents with a greater insight into the events that occur in their child’s time in childcare.

Learning Stories [58] are documents that are used by caregivers and educators in childcare settings. They use a storytelling format instead of a traditional ‘observation’ report to document the different ways that young children learn, and capture the moment in greater detail and provide parents with a greater insight into the events that occur in their child’s time in childcare.
A similar study in New York City found that more than a third of families on the child care assistance waitlist either lost jobs or were unable to work, and one in five had either missed or been late for work because of their child care problems. Perhaps even more alarmingly, a quarter of families on a child care waitlist in Minnesota had to rely on public assistance in order to make ends meet while waiting to access child care subsidies.

The first crèche was opened by Firmin Marbeau on 14 November 1844 in Paris,[62] The Société des Crèches was recognized by the French government in 1869. Originating in Europe in the late 18th and early 19th century, day cares were established in the United States by private charities in the 1850s, such as the Charity Organization Society founded by Ansley Wilcox. The Fitch Creche in Buffalo, New York was known as the first day center for working mothers in the United States. Another at that time was the New York Day Nursery in 1854.

All childcare workers must have, or be undertaking, the minimum "Certificate III in Children's Services" in order to work in a centre (Recognition of Prior Learning is available to help qualify staff with many years experience, but no qualifications). (Common more advanced qualifications are "Diploma of Children's Services" and an Early Childhood Education degree).
Learning stories originate from New Zealand as they use a learning model in their curriculum called "Te Whaariki". It highlights children's learning outcomes as 'disposition' which are “situated learning strategies plus motivation-participation repertoires from which a learner recognize, selects, edits, responds to, resists, searches for and constructs learning opportunities” [60][61]
Combining the best modern technology with a kid-centered, homey atmosphere, TREASURES Child Care turns it up a notch using Brightwheel software for iOS and Android. TREASURES child care professionals recognize it can be hard for parents (especially new ones) to leave their little ones in someone else’s care. Now, Brightwheel offers added comfort so parents are able to have an instant link to the space where their children can play and grow. In addition to the care of licensed, trained professionals, the staff at TREASURES are thrilled to add to the transparency within the facility. Brightwheel allows for instant updates through photo sharing, record keeping, and communication regarding meals, diaper changes, and activities. Parents can leave their littles in the care of TREASURES professionals and spend their days feeling the utmost comfort, knowing, and seeing, their little treasures are having a great time!
" We just wanted to reach out and tell you how impressed we were with Treasures during our visit on February 19. We opened the door to this warm, calm, inviting facility and immediately felt any apprehensions about leaving "our baby" melt away. The entry area was roomy, organized, and clean (so nice when we had all our bulky ski gear on), the sign in process was efficient, and most importantly, the lovely caregivers were calm, confident, warm, and reassuring. Back near the child care rooms, our 3 year old, transitioned from us to a care giver and headed into the room without any crying or struggle. This was a pleasant surprise (ok, a shock!) to us, given we had never been to Treasures, and since the last time we had recently taken her to a babysitting facility at a NH ski resort, she came unraveled- in a big way!! We really attribute this smooth drop off to your staff and the general calm, welcoming feel of the facility. We loved the window area we could view her from, and we left quickly for the slopes, feeling she was in great hands and was lucky to be at such a wonderful place for the day. It was a delight as we would ski down the mountain, passing Treasures, knowing she was in there, being well taken care of. Thank you for giving us that peace of mind."
The staff of this state-licensed facility are specialists in non-recurring child care, and with kindness and patience help children successfully transition in unfamiliar surroundings. Your infants and toddlers are in good hands with our caring counselors. TREASURES staff are trained in first aid, CPR, child development and behavior management. Our staff participate in on-going and relevant early childhood training. And, our child-to-caregiver ratio assures full attention and the best possible care. Entertaining your kids will be no challenge at all! For the peace of mind and comfort of visiting families, TREASURES strives for consistent caregiver scheduling during a child's stay in the center.
Access to child care is essential to a woman’s ability to participate in the workforce, and a lack of access to child care affects the work-family balance of both women and men. Women need to have the ability to make the choices that are best for them and their families in both the short and long term, and greater national investments in child care and preschool programs could help remove some of the constraints that may push mothers toward decisions that have negative economic consequences for them and their families down the road. It would make quality care more affordable for American families and support mothers’ employment.
Note: Some programs offering child day care obtain a general business license to operate from the county within which they do business; however, that license is not the same as a child day care license obtained from the Virginia Department of Social Services (VDSS), which holds the child day care provider accountable to the health and safety standards set forth by the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Childcare varies dramatically across cultures. These discrepancies are attributed to the homestead and household environments. That is, the type of work performed by adult caretakers in a given community strongly influence the type of childcare used. In agricultural/ horticultural societies where work is done to provide sustenance for the community, siblings and similar-aged children are responsible for younger children.[2] While many global communities prefer children aged 7–10 for designated caregiving responsibilities, children no younger than 12 are preferred in the Western world where paid childcare is common.[23]
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