If you would like to enjoy a special night out or participate in one of the Resort's evening events for adults, your child can enjoy their own special evening at Kids' Night Out based out of the FunZone 2.0. Participants will receive a $5 arcade card, enjoy access to the Ozone, challenge their friends in Laser Tag, and enjoy pizza, caesar salad, ice cream cones, and popcorn with a caring child care staff. Tuesday Nights from 5:30 pm - 9:00 pm, December 7, 2018 - April 7, 2019 $55 per night, per child, ages 3-11. 24-hour advance reservations required. Please make sure children wear socks. Children must be toilet trained. Call (800) 419-4615 to make your arrangements.
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Parent-Child Home Program celebrated 14 families graduating from their 2-year program on May 25, at The Green, 85 Main St., North Adams.  Families enjoyed pizza and cupcakes, a short circle time, and parachute play with their home visitors, as they said good-bye.  The Parent-Child Home Program is a brain building program for 18 month old – 2 1/2 year old children and their caregivers.  Families receive fun books, toys, and lots of ideas to help their children get ready to succeed in school.  For more information call the coordinator, Karen Rowe, 663-6593 x. 27.
Childcare has been on the rise in Mexico due to the increasing interest it has within the people and the effect it has on the government. This is due to the rise of urban areas in developing countries and the need to keep up with the economic development.[84] There has always been many child care services available but due to the high costs, they were mainly unavailable for the low income families.[85] Childcare became a hot topic of discussion when more women were joining the workforce and the debate of how this would affect how the children would be raised.[86] Another topic of debate is how would the women pay for these expensive services while working minimum wage jobs or having limited times they could work, so the idea of subsidizes arose.[86] In specific to the child, the topic of “street children”, how and where children should grow up, was debated, and if they should be allowed to be considered part of the street instead of a particular home.[87] This issue was of great debate because it not only affects the child but also the community the child is in, since they usually seek out public spaces for shelter, food and play.[87] Childcare is generally broken into three general categories such as governmental institutions, religious organizations, and independent agencies (such as NGOS).[87] All of these take on the same objectives which are “containment, paternalist cure approach and street education.”[87]
Local legislation may regulate the operation of daycare centers, affecting staffing requirements. Laws may mandate staffing ratios (for example 6 weeks to 12 months, 1:4; 12 months to 18 months, 1:5; 18 months to 24 months, 1:9; et and even higher ratios for older children). Legislation may mandate qualifications of supervisors. Staff typically do not require any qualifications but staff under the age of eighteen may require supervision. Typically, once the child reaches the age of twelve, they are no longer covered by daycare legislation and programs for older children may not be regulated.

Franchising of family child care home facilities attempts to bring economies of scale to home daycare. A central operator handles marketing, administration and perhaps some central purchasing while the actual care occurs in individual homes. The central operator may provide training to the individual care providers. Some providers even offer enrichment programs to take the daycare experience to a more educational and professional level. An example would be Wonderschool, which provides caregivers with a proprietary technology platform, as well as licensing, marketing, and administrative services.[21]


All childcare workers must have, or be undertaking, the minimum "Certificate III in Children's Services" in order to work in a centre (Recognition of Prior Learning is available to help qualify staff with many years experience, but no qualifications). (Common more advanced qualifications are "Diploma of Children's Services" and an Early Childhood Education degree).
Learning Stories [58] are documents that are used by caregivers and educators in childcare settings. They use a storytelling format instead of a traditional ‘observation’ report to document the different ways that young children learn, and capture the moment in greater detail and provide parents with a greater insight into the events that occur in their child’s time in childcare.

Learning Stories [58] are documents that are used by caregivers and educators in childcare settings. They use a storytelling format instead of a traditional ‘observation’ report to document the different ways that young children learn, and capture the moment in greater detail and provide parents with a greater insight into the events that occur in their child’s time in childcare.
Additionally, legislation typically defines what constitutes daycare (e.g., so as to not regulate individual babysitters). It may specify details of the physical facilities (washroom, eating, sleeping, lighting levels, etc.). The minimum window space may be such that it precludes day cares from being in a basement. It may specify the minimum floor space per child (for example 2.8 square metres) and the maximum number of children per room (for example 24). It may mandate minimum outdoor time (for example 2 hours for programs 6 hours or longer). Legislation may mandate qualifications of supervisors. Staff typically do not require any qualifications but staff under the age of eighteen may require supervision. Some legislation also establishes rating systems, the number and condition of various toys, and documents to be maintained.[68] Typically[citation needed], once children reach the age of twelve, they are no longer covered by daycare legislation and programs for older children may not be regulated.
We believe that all children are highly intelligent and capable of learning. All children are unique individuals and deserve respect as a child and as a person. Our goals and objectives as child development providers are to contribute to the child’s total development. We are sensitive to the fact that developmental ability and personalities can vary widely at any age, and help children to build self-control by learning to follow rules, sharing, taking turns, and working in a group.
Fifty years ago suggesting that one parent stay at home and forgo paid employment to provide child care would have made plenty of sense both culturally and economically. This was largely because families could live comfortably on one breadwinner’s income and also because women had traditionally been relegated to the domestic sphere. But in the past 40 years, due to both social advances and economic changes, American families have undergone a dramatic change. Leaving the workforce to provide care today, even temporarily, carries real risks.
More contemporary proposals for government advancement of day care in the United States have experienced a checkered path, for example, in 1971, the Comprehensive Child Development Act was passed by Congress, but was vetoed by Richard Nixon. It "would have created nationally funded child care centers providing early childhood services and after-school care, as well as nutrition, counseling, and even medical and dental care. The centers would charge parents on a sliding scale."[63] Various proposals have been considered, but to date, none leading to legislation that would establish a national policy supporting day care in the United States.

In Germany, preschool education is the domain of the Kindertagesstätte (literally "children's day site", often shortened to Kita or KITA), which is usually divided into the Kinderkrippe (crèche) for toddlers (age up to 3 years), and the Kindergarten for children who are older than three years and before school. Children in their last Kindergarten year may be grouped into a Vorschule ("preschool") and given special pedagogic attention; special preschool institutions comparable to the US-American kindergarten are the exception.


Kitas are typically run by public (i. e. communal) and "free" carriers (such as the churches, other religious organizations, social organizations with a background in the trade unions and profit-orientated corporations), and subsidized by the states (Länder). In this case, the care is open to the general public—e. g. a Protestant or Muslim child may claim a place in a Kita run by the catholic church.

Choosing child care is an important decision. You can learn about choices in these short Child Care Options videos. Safe and positive child care sets the stage for healthy growth and development. It takes time, patience and understanding of what to look for when selecting child care. You know the needs of your child and family.However, you may need assistance in matching those needs to available resources. That is why OCFS is proud to share with you the supports that we have put in place to assist you in making this important decision.
Parent-Child Home Program celebrated 14 families graduating from their 2-year program on May 25, at The Green, 85 Main St., North Adams.  Families enjoyed pizza and cupcakes, a short circle time, and parachute play with their home visitors, as they said good-bye.  The Parent-Child Home Program is a brain building program for 18 month old – 2 1/2 year old children and their caregivers.  Families receive fun books, toys, and lots of ideas to help their children get ready to succeed in school.  For more information call the coordinator, Karen Rowe, 663-6593 x. 27.
Passion for providing high value childcare services to working families is just one of the reasons we have developed cooperative relationships with the Brandywine School District. Staff members regularly attend meeting with BSD staff that results in new options for our families. Brandywine Child Care and Preschool has a variety of benefits for you:
I'm the youngest of my family of four, though my extended family is very, very large. I've not only taken care of many of cousin's children, but I was a care taker for three years as my full time job. I watched over my older sister's business partner's two girls from senior year in high school to the beginning of my junior year in college. I would have continued with such work, yet my boss had recently quit her job and did not need my services for some time. Thus, I had to move on. I have since looked after her children when she needs, and as stated before, many of my cousins have had children and contact me for taking care of them. I really like working with kids, I learn so much for myself and I always come back with wonderful stories to share. I have also been accepted into a program to school children in foreign countries in the far future and it is something I'm greatly looking forward to.
Brandy wine childcare is a place were children learn how to problem solve and get along with each ot...her. Also the resources that teachers provide for parents when a child needs additional help. Brandywine childcare staff are friendly and loving to the all children. So if your looking for a place for your child to learn and have fun at the same time recommend brandy wine childcare and preschool See More

Kitas are typically run by public (i. e. communal) and "free" carriers (such as the churches, other religious organizations, social organizations with a background in the trade unions and profit-orientated corporations), and subsidized by the states (Länder). In this case, the care is open to the general public—e. g. a Protestant or Muslim child may claim a place in a Kita run by the catholic church.


According to Chris Knight, the first humans were few; then the population "exploded .... Population expansion on such a scale is inconsistent with female tolerance of infanticide, harassment, or the heavy costs to mothers of male philandering and double standards. If unusually large numbers of unusually large-brained offspring were being successfully raised to maturity, the quality of childcare must have been exceptional. We know what the optimal solution would have been. There can be no doubt that mothers would have done best by ... taking advantage of every available childcare resource."[45]
The service is known as day care[50][51] or childcare[52][53][54] in the United Kingdom, North America, and Australia and as crèche in Ireland and New Zealand. According to Oxford Living Dictionaries, child care in two words can in addition have the broader meaning of the care of a child by anyone, including the parents,[55] but US dictionaries do not record that spelling or meaning.[53][56][54] In English-speaking and other conservative countries, the vast majority of childcare is still performed by the parents, in-house nannies or through informal arrangements with relatives, neighbors or friends, but most children are in daycare centers for most of the day in Nordic Countries, for example. Child care in the child's own home is traditionally provided by a nanny or au pair, or by extended family members including grandparents, aunts and uncles. Child care is provided in nurseries or crèches or by a nanny or family child care provider caring for children in their own homes. It can also take on a more formal structure, with education, child development, discipline and even preschool education falling into the fold of services.
In Canada, the workforce is predominantly female (95%) and low paid, averaging only 60% of average workforce wage. Many employees are at local minimum wage and are typically paid by the hour rather than salaried. In the United States, "child care worker" is the fifth most female-dominated occupation (95.5% female in 1999).[18] In the US, staffing requirements vary from state to state.
Spain provides paid maternity leave of 16 weeks with 30-50% of mothers returning to work (most full-time) after this[citation needed], thus babies 4 months of age tend to be placed in daycare centers. Adult-infant ratios are about 1:7-8 first year and 1:16-18 second year.[citation needed] Public preschool education is provided for most children aged 3–5 years in "Infantil" schools which also provide primary school education.[citation needed]
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