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Inspections are conducted before a child day care program is licensed or registered and on an ongoing basis once the program is in operation. Inspection results are available on the OCFS web site through this Search for Child Care page. If a parent or child care provider has questions or concerns about the results of an inspection, they can contact the licensing staff or the regional office that oversees the program.
My work has changed. I am not doing nanny work per se anymore, but more like therapeutic respite care. The childcare I currently do is in service to coaching the family. I am there for parents who are looking for more understanding of their children's behavior and more peace with their role as a parent. I am there for children who are not comfortable with the life around them, who resist transitions, who challenge boundaries. It is my aim to be a translator for one to the other. I obtained my Master's Degree from Bank St. College in Early Childhood Development. I am a certified "Beyond Consequences " Parent Coach, and for many years trained in Pre/Perinatal Psychology. I have 25 years experience working hands-on with children in a wide variety of ages and settings. I am available in 3-hour slots to work with children. Parent coaching is additional and required.
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Many types of childcare discuss the different ways in which children are cared for by adults or older children. One additional type of child care involves children caring for adults. Children as caretakers are most often seen in developing countries with restricted or hard-to-access medical assistance. Child caretakers are common in families where the parents are affected by HIV/AIDS and other mental illnesses that might limit their parental functioning.[22]

Parents are typically the legal owners of the non-profit day care and will routinely provide consulting services in areas in which they are professionally qualified (for example accounting, legal advice, or human resources) for free. (There are some non-profits not operated by parents, but by a board of directors made up of community representatives who want what is good for the children.)

Kitas are typically run by public (i. e. communal) and "free" carriers (such as the churches, other religious organizations, social organizations with a background in the trade unions and profit-orientated corporations), and subsidized by the states (Länder). In this case, the care is open to the general public—e. g. a Protestant or Muslim child may claim a place in a Kita run by the catholic church.
The costs of child care are even more extreme for younger mothers. The average age when mother’s first give birth in the United States is 25.7 years, meaning that half of new mothers are under the age of 26 when they have their first child. Not surprisingly, younger mothers tend to have lower incomes: By virtue of their age, they have less job tenure and are more likely than older mothers to still be completing their education. But this means that mothers under age 25 with a young child who are paying for child care end up spending a staggering one-third—33 percent—of their income on care because they typically earn less. (see Table 1) It is critical that these women have the opportunity to finish their education and gain job experience, but child care expenses can make that a daunting prospect.

We are excited to be a part of the proven success of early care and education programs. Through research, services and advocacy, Child Care Services Association realizes improvements to the child care system throughout North Carolina and across the country. As a national nonprofit agency and United Way member, we are proud to be a leader and innovator in strengthening the early care and education system.
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