In the United States, childcare in regulated commercial or family childcare home setting is administered or led by teachers who may have a Child Development Associate or higher credentials. These higher credentials include Associate, Bachelor, and even master's degrees in the field of Early Childhood Education (ECE). Although childcare professionals may obtain a degree, many states require that they attend workshops yearly to upgrade their knowledge and skill levels. Many day cares require a teacher to obtain a certain amount of training. For example, Texas requires a minimum of 25 hours a year, and the first year as a teacher, you are required to have 50 hours.

The National Institute of Health released a study in March, 2007 after following a group of children through early childhood to the 6th grade.[91] The study found that the children who received a higher quality of childcare scored higher on 5th grade vocabulary tests than the children who had attended childcare of a lower quality. The study also reported that teachers found children from childcare to be "disobedient", fight more frequently, and more argumentative. The study reported the increases in both aggression and vocabulary were small. "The researchers emphasized that the children’s behavior was within the normal range and were not considered clinically disordered."


The Child Care Resource Network works in cooperation with Early Learning Indiana and their Indiana Business Partnership Project to develop child care resource and referral programs for employers who recognize the relationship between quality child care arrangements and increased productivity, reduced turnover, reduced tardiness and absenteeism, raised morale and an enhanced corporate image.
My child was seriously injured here due to neglect. My children hated every single time they had to... attend, complaining of being ignored and much worse. The staff FALSIFY documents and have no understanding of supervision or ratios. Anyone considering this center I advise to do your research first; ask around and check out licensing reports! See More
" We just wanted to reach out and tell you how impressed we were with Treasures during our visit on February 19. We opened the door to this warm, calm, inviting facility and immediately felt any apprehensions about leaving "our baby" melt away. The entry area was roomy, organized, and clean (so nice when we had all our bulky ski gear on), the sign in process was efficient, and most importantly, the lovely caregivers were calm, confident, warm, and reassuring. Back near the child care rooms, our 3 year old, transitioned from us to a care giver and headed into the room without any crying or struggle. This was a pleasant surprise (ok, a shock!) to us, given we had never been to Treasures, and since the last time we had recently taken her to a babysitting facility at a NH ski resort, she came unraveled- in a big way!! We really attribute this smooth drop off to your staff and the general calm, welcoming feel of the facility. We loved the window area we could view her from, and we left quickly for the slopes, feeling she was in great hands and was lucky to be at such a wonderful place for the day. It was a delight as we would ski down the mountain, passing Treasures, knowing she was in there, being well taken care of. Thank you for giving us that peace of mind."
The benefits of high-quality pre-K and child care are enormous. It is an essential way to close the achievement gap between children of different economic backgrounds and prepare them for kindergarten, primary school, and beyond. Decades of research have also shown that investing in our children at an early age pays social, educational, and economic dividends over the course of a child’s lifetime. Children deserve access to affordable high-quality education that promotes school readiness, regardless of their family situation.
I have been a nanny for the same family for just under 6 years. I have been taking care of the 3 children since they were 6, 4, and 6 weeks old. Now the youngest just started kindergarten full time and I am no longer needed full time. I am still very close to the family and help out whenever I get the opportunity. But now I am looking to find a family who I can fit into and be a big help. A few of my best qualities are, patience, fun, kind, and I am very creative. I am all about following the parents' set schedule for a child and doing whatever is necessary to do my job to the fullest. I am a very hard worker and will do my best at all times. I am also very reliable so I will be there for you whenever you need me. I also have some experience as an assistant preschool teacher so I know how to be helpful with early childhood learning play. Thank you for your time I look forward to hearing from you
Parent Child Home Program: FREE Books and Toys for children 16 mo. to 3 years old this fall.  PCHP is a home visiting program.  A trained Home Visitor will bring FREE books and toys for your child to keep.  They read, play, and do art activities with your child and you to help your child be ready to learn in school.  We are accepting new children and doing intakes for the coming school year.  If you’d like more information, please call Karen at (413-663-6593 ex. 27, email: [email protected], or TEXT:  (413)663-0234
In this more informal type of care, a parent or legal guardian selects an individual- often a family member, friend, or neighbor to care for all the children in one family or up to 2 unrelated children. Legally Certified Providers must pass Montana and FBI criminal background checks and Child Protective Services background checks but are not otherwise regulated or monitored by the State of Montana.
Most families currently have three options for securing child care. First, parents can stay at home and care for their children themselves. But this is increasingly difficult, as most families now rely on two breadwinners to stay above water. Moreover, mothers are more likely than fathers to take time away from paid work to care for a child, which can exacerbate mothers’ lifetime earnings gap. Second, parents can pay for child care out of pocket. But this approach is very costly for families, eating up 35.9 percent of a low-income family’s monthly budget. The third option for families is to use federal- or state-funded child care, but access to any publicly funded program, let alone a high-quality program, is very limited. Nationwide, nearly three in four children are not enrolled in a federal or state-funded pre-K program.
The story becomes even bleaker for mothers who are living below the poverty line. As Table 1 shows, 26 percent of working mothers in poverty pay for child care out of pocket, and those expenses eat up nearly half—42.6 percent—of their monthly wages. It is vital that these women have work support, since they are more likely to be single parents and since seeking paid employment is required to have access to certain governmental benefits. Employment is also an important pathway into the middle class, but when child care is as expensive as it is, it places a disproportionate burden on the mothers who can least afford it.

In addition to the positive long-term impacts that high-quality preschool and child care have on children and the economy, these programs provide important benefits to working parents, especially working mothers. The prohibitively high costs of private child care and the dearth of quality, accessible public providers means that parents are often left to choose between the lesser of two evils: low-quality care or forgoing needed pay to stay at home and care for a child themselves.

In Denmark day-cares accept children ranging from 6 months old to 3 years old. 91.2% of 1-2 year old children are enrolled in different types of day-care institutions. Most of these are managed by a municipality and mostly government funded. The different types of institutions ranges from separate day-care institutions (Vuggestue), kindergartens with a day-care department (Integrerede institutioner) and in-home day-care (Dagpleje).[82]
Evidence from other countries shows that child care subsidies increase women’s labor force participation, help them obtain more stable jobs, and increase their income. While interventions in the United States have been much more modest by international standards, there is ample evidence showing that child care assistance helps working moms. Families who receive child care support are more likely to be employed and have longer employment spells that families who do not receive support. The effects are particularly strong for single mothers, who are nearly 40 percent more likely to maintain employment over two years than those who do not have help paying for child care.
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For all providers, the largest expense is labor. In a 1999 Canadian survey of formal child care centers, labor accounted for 63% of costs and the industry had an average profit of 5.3%.[17] Given the labor-intensive nature of the industry, it is not surprising that the same survey showed little economies of scale between larger and smaller operators.
Access to child care is essential to a woman’s ability to participate in the workforce, and a lack of access to child care affects the work-family balance of both women and men. Women need to have the ability to make the choices that are best for them and their families in both the short and long term, and greater national investments in child care and preschool programs could help remove some of the constraints that may push mothers toward decisions that have negative economic consequences for them and their families down the road. It would make quality care more affordable for American families and support mothers’ employment.
There are many things to consider when parents enroll a child into a care center or other form of paid childcare, and there is much controversy surrounding the potential benefits and harm caused by this type of care. The parental decisions of leaving a child with someone and who that someone will be are two of the most difficult decisions in the lives of most parents.[30] A parent must consider the safety and security of their children when making this decision. The development of a child has many factors, but it is most directly influenced by the type and quality of care that is most regularly provided to the child.
In response to this urgent problem, President Obama has proposed to allocate $1.4 billion in 2014 to expand public child care services, $15 billion over the next decade to expand state home-visitation programs to America’s most vulnerable families, and $75 billion over the next decade to invest in expanding access to quality preschool. This funding would help millions of parents, especially mothers, across America better balance their work and caregiving responsibilities without putting their children’s well-being or their own jobs at risk.
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