Fifty years ago suggesting that one parent stay at home and forgo paid employment to provide child care would have made plenty of sense both culturally and economically. This was largely because families could live comfortably on one breadwinner’s income and also because women had traditionally been relegated to the domestic sphere. But in the past 40 years, due to both social advances and economic changes, American families have undergone a dramatic change. Leaving the workforce to provide care today, even temporarily, carries real risks.
Studies have been done to get an annual salary estimate for a female caregiver. One survey suggested that the value of a mother's work, if she were paid the average wage for each task she performs in running the household and caring for her children, is $117,867 per year.[42] The reason for the high salary is because mothers typically perform about 10 different job functions throughout the week. Some of these job functions are poorly paid, including cleaning, driving, caring for children, and washing laundry, but others, especially financial and managerial tasks that the survey equated with being the Chief Executive Officer of a company, are highly paid. Neither a nanny nor a housekeeper makes nearly as much money, and almost all of these tasks except direct child care also have to be done by non-parents. The value of unpaid childcare is also an important figure in various legal entities. Expert witnesses (most often economists) are occasionally brought into court cases to give estimates on the value of unpaid labor. By giving estimation, the plaintiff or defendant can be fairly compensated for their labor.
Franchising of family child care home facilities attempts to bring economies of scale to home daycare. A central operator handles marketing, administration and perhaps some central purchasing while the actual care occurs in individual homes. The central operator may provide training to the individual care providers. Some providers even offer enrichment programs to take the daycare experience to a more educational and professional level. An example would be Wonderschool, which provides caregivers with a proprietary technology platform, as well as licensing, marketing, and administrative services.[21]
The story becomes even bleaker for mothers who are living below the poverty line. As Table 1 shows, 26 percent of working mothers in poverty pay for child care out of pocket, and those expenses eat up nearly half—42.6 percent—of their monthly wages. It is vital that these women have work support, since they are more likely to be single parents and since seeking paid employment is required to have access to certain governmental benefits. Employment is also an important pathway into the middle class, but when child care is as expensive as it is, it places a disproportionate burden on the mothers who can least afford it.
Child Care Licensing (CCL) via Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) maintains this web site as a public service. All information provided is believed to be accurate and reliable; however, CCL via DFPS assumes no responsibility for the use of the information provided. Since inaccuracies may occur, these pages do not replace official sources. If you find some questionable information, please e-mail [email protected]
Hi, my name is Tyla and I have been providing child care services to families for over 10 years and am currently looking for a full-time position with an awesome family! *I have over 2000 hours in early classroom + many ECE completed courses as well as many years experience as a nanny/house manager (overnights included) *CPR/First Aid, Medicine Administration, Universal Precautions Cert. *Bachelor's of Science in Psychology *Currently working on Masters (Mental Health Counseling) *I have amazing references! *During my time with kiddos, I incorporate many activities, including outside play time, arts and crafts, reading, pretend play, music and dancing, and other creative play. I also love the outdoors and bringing children on walks, going to the park and playing sports. Also, I do have two kiddos of my own and tend to either work 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. while they are at school or in camp, or I arrange to have them with me when that works for everyone. I have amazing references for this!

An important aspect that many center based child cares have been trying to implement into their mission statement and everyday routine has been of being aware of the multiple cultures they will be dealing with. This was seen as being important because of the growing numbers of families considering and seeking childcare. Childcare has become an important aspect of society since, “Over thirteen million American children under 5 years of age experience some form of child care before entering formal school.”[12] Programs must understand similarities and differences between cultures/ ethnic groups. This must be done to understand the overall diversity of the community.[1] Children should be able to have their cultural practices represented as well as be able to learn about other cultures they have not been exposed to. This is of great importance because it adds to their mental development and their understanding of the world.


The fact that women are more likely to take time out of the workforce to provide unpaid care for their children is part of the reason why there is a persistent gender wage gap in this country—10.5 percent of the differences in men’s and women’s earnings can be attributed to labor-force experience. When women work less, they pay less into Social Security over a shorter period of time, which is one of the reasons why retired women are more likely to live in poverty than retired men.
Child Care Connections is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that serves as the only child care resource and referral agency in Gallatin, Park, Meagher, Broadwater, Jefferson, and Lewis and Clark Counties. Research demonstrates that consistent nurturing child care, with good parenting, helps children develop to their full potential. Child Care Connections supports families and the local economy by encouraging quality child care and safety.
Mt. Zion's programs are built around the needs of each child. Teacher to child ratios are low to provide for individual attention. Children daily experience planned activities and open-ended experiences for individual growth and development. Children explore their world through music, large motor play, sensory exploration, language, and small group events.
The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in its programs on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability or political beliefs. Persons with disability who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact the USDA"s TARGET Center at (202)720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination, write the USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (202)720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity employer.

Legislation may mandate staffing ratios (for example, 6 weeks to 12 months, 1:4; 12 months to 18 months, 1:5; 18 months to 24 months, 1:9; etc.). The caregiver-to-child ratio is one factor indicative of quality of care. Ratios vary greatly by location and by daycare center. Potential consequences of a caregiver:child ratio which is too high could be very serious[citation needed]. However, many states allow a higher numbers of toddlers to caregivers and some centers do not comply consistently. For example, within the US: Pennsylvania, ages 1–3, 1 teacher to 5 children;[69] Missouri: age 2, 1 teacher to 8 children;[70] North Carolina: 1 teacher to 10 children.[68]
TREASURES Child Care Center provides nurturing vacation child care for children 6 weeks to 3 years old in a loving and safe environment. Settling your little one at TREASURES will give you the peace of mind and flexibility to enjoy special vacation activities, such as a fun ski day or invigorating snowshoe outing with your spouse or an activity with one of your other children. The centers slopeside location in the Resort Village is perfect for parents who want to enjoy their own mountain adventures but want the convenience of being able to check on their little ones if desired.
The National Institute of Health released a study in March, 2007 after following a group of children through early childhood to the 6th grade.[91] The study found that the children who received a higher quality of childcare scored higher on 5th grade vocabulary tests than the children who had attended childcare of a lower quality. The study also reported that teachers found children from childcare to be "disobedient", fight more frequently, and more argumentative. The study reported the increases in both aggression and vocabulary were small. "The researchers emphasized that the children’s behavior was within the normal range and were not considered clinically disordered."
A care-penalty is the price one pays for doing care work for a family member. Care giving demands a lot out of an individual, and as a result there is a high opportunity cost. The opportunity cost can relate to both time and money. Instead of taking care of a family member, a caregiver could spend time working or performing more leisure activities. Care penalties are not strictly related to childcare- they can also refer to taking care of a sick family member, babysitting a younger sibling, or taking an elderly family member on errands such as grocery shopping or doctor's appointments.

Child Care Connections is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that serves as the only child care resource and referral agency in Gallatin, Park, Meagher, Broadwater, Jefferson, and Lewis and Clark Counties. Research demonstrates that consistent nurturing child care, with good parenting, helps children develop to their full potential. Child Care Connections supports families and the local economy by encouraging quality child care and safety.
Childcare is primarily funded by parents, however the Single Funding Formula (pre-school funding) can be used at some day nurseries, playgroups and schools for a maximum of 5 sessions per week, after a child reaches 3 years. The government introduced a childcare allowance (vouchers) by which employers could make payments for childcare, prior to tax, on employees' wages.
Mt. Zion's programs are built around the needs of each child. Teacher to child ratios are low to provide for individual attention. Children daily experience planned activities and open-ended experiences for individual growth and development. Children explore their world through music, large motor play, sensory exploration, language, and small group events.

Most families currently have three options for securing child care. First, parents can stay at home and care for their children themselves. But this is increasingly difficult, as most families now rely on two breadwinners to stay above water. Moreover, mothers are more likely than fathers to take time away from paid work to care for a child, which can exacerbate mothers’ lifetime earnings gap. Second, parents can pay for child care out of pocket. But this approach is very costly for families, eating up 35.9 percent of a low-income family’s monthly budget. The third option for families is to use federal- or state-funded child care, but access to any publicly funded program, let alone a high-quality program, is very limited. Nationwide, nearly three in four children are not enrolled in a federal or state-funded pre-K program.


There are links between the income, education, and importance of consistency and the well being of the child, to the parents, and the development of their child. Higher educated parents place more importance on the education of their children than the parents who do not have a college degree or have not graduated from high school. Likewise, parents who have a higher income level are more willing to part with their money to purchase a private tutor or nanny to assist the parent in the education of their child. They also tend to stress the importance of being socially inept.[31] The first few years of a child's life are important to form a basis for good education, morality, self-discipline and social integration. Consistency of approach, skills and qualifications of caregivers have been shown in many studies to improve the chances of a child reaching his or her full potential. Child care in much of western society is currently in crisis: there are not enough daycare spots, the cost for most parents is beyond their means, and child care staff are grossly underpaid. Starting wages for Early Childcare Educators start at $11 or $12, causing a high turnover rate, and decreases the likelihood of potentially safe, effective, and loving child care providers from even entering the field. For preschool teachers the average salary is about $28,570.[35] According to a survey done by HiMama, 68% of for-profit child care organizations ranked 'Labor' as their top risk and 65% ranked 'Talent and Recruitment' as their top priority for 2017.[36]
The day care industry is a continuum from personal parental care to large, regulated institutions. Some childminders care for children from several families at the same time, either in their own home (commonly known as "family day care" in Australia) or in a specialized child care facility. Some employers provide nursery provisions for their employees at or near the place of employment. For-profit day care corporations often exist where the market is sufficiently large or there are government subsidies. Research shows that not-for-profits are much more likely to produce the high quality environments in which children thrive."[19] Local governments, often municipalities, may operate non-profit day care centers. For all providers, the largest expense is labor. Local legislation may regulate the operation of daycare centers, affecting staffing requirements. In Canada, the workforce is predominantly female (95%) and low paid, averaging only 60% of average workforce wage. Some jurisdictions require licensing or certification. Legislation may specify details of the physical facilities (washroom, eating, sleeping, lighting levels, etc.).
Developmental benefits are also seen for older siblings or relatives tasked to care for younger children. For example, children with siblings are more likely to prohibit prosocial behaviors (such as the ability to take another's perspective or sharing with others) than children without siblings.[44] Additionally, sibling caretakers have to opportunity to develop deeper communication skills as they teach younger siblings to participate in everyday tasks.[44]
Kitas are typically run by public (i. e. communal) and "free" carriers (such as the churches, other religious organizations, social organizations with a background in the trade unions and profit-orientated corporations), and subsidized by the states (Länder). In this case, the care is open to the general public—e. g. a Protestant or Muslim child may claim a place in a Kita run by the catholic church.
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NORTH ADAMS, MA (June 8, 2017) – Anne Nemetz-Carlson, President/CEO, announced that the MA Department of Early Education and Care (EEC) and Children’s Investment Fund has awarded to Child Care of the Berkshires a new grant of $1,000,000 to make improvements to the Haskins facility which houses the Monument Square Early Childhood Center and a variety of family support programs, including the Family Center, the Healthy Families Program, and the Parent Child Home Early Literacy Program.
Spain provides paid maternity leave of 16 weeks with 30-50% of mothers returning to work (most full-time) after this[citation needed], thus babies 4 months of age tend to be placed in daycare centers. Adult-infant ratios are about 1:7-8 first year and 1:16-18 second year.[citation needed] Public preschool education is provided for most children aged 3–5 years in "Infantil" schools which also provide primary school education.[citation needed]
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