This is a “step in the right direction,” but more needs to be done to reduce child-care costs, especially at the federal level, Dobbins said. For instance, money for the Child Care Access Means Parents in School program, which supports low-income student parents, program shrank from $25 million to $15 million between 2001 and 2017, the report said.

There is a great deal of empirical evidence that shows how higher child care costs have a negative impact on mothers’ employment. Mothers are more likely to leave employment and less likely to start new jobs when the costs of child care are high. It is also difficult for parents to keep their jobs when they do not have access to consistent quality child care. A study conducted by Jeffrey D. Lyons in North Carolina found that about one in four families who were on a waitlist for child care assistance either lost or had to quit their jobs while they waited for an opening.


"Nearly every Saturday of the 2013 and 2014 ski season, our son went to Treasures. He was so excited about it each week! We loved the attentive care, open and clean space and the healthy food. They let him nap when he needed to and there was always a number of activities for him to choose from. He even got to try out skis on a few occasions. We're sad that he won't be there this season, since he'll ... be over 3. We highly recommend Treasures to everyone and it's the main reason that we chose Smuggs."
Learning Stories [58] are documents that are used by caregivers and educators in childcare settings. They use a storytelling format instead of a traditional ‘observation’ report to document the different ways that young children learn, and capture the moment in greater detail and provide parents with a greater insight into the events that occur in their child’s time in childcare.

Our volunteers and community partners play a key role in our Head Start and Early Head start programs. While 80% of the program is funded through federal dollars, CCA works with community partners to meet the remaining 20% of funds, volunteer service hours, and in-kind donations needed to operate Head Start and Early Head Start. As we work to expand research and policy to advance early childhood development, we wish to thank those who give their resources to make this possible.
In his 2013 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama made a historic pledge to provide universal, high-quality pre-K education to our nation’s children. He chose to make this one of his administration’s priorities with good reason: Early childhood education has myriad benefits, including better, more equitable long-term outcomes for children of divergent economic backgrounds. Moreover, investments in these programs help cultivate a future workforce, secure long-term economic competitiveness, and develop our nation’s future leaders. Universal high-quality pre-K and child care would also throw a much-needed raft to families across America that are struggling to stay afloat while footing costly child care bills, missing work to provide care, or sending their children—our nation’s future innovators and workforce—to low-quality care centers.
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More contemporary proposals for government advancement of day care in the United States have experienced a checkered path, for example, in 1971, the Comprehensive Child Development Act was passed by Congress, but was vetoed by Richard Nixon. It "would have created nationally funded child care centers providing early childhood services and after-school care, as well as nutrition, counseling, and even medical and dental care. The centers would charge parents on a sliding scale."[63] Various proposals have been considered, but to date, none leading to legislation that would establish a national policy supporting day care in the United States.
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